Recorded Webinar: A History of Native American Boarding Schools

Recorded On: 07/20/2021

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Webinar Description

In the 1800's assimilation was the government’s policy to work Native Americans into mainstream society. One of the ways was taking Native children from their homes and sending them to boarding schools. "Save the man, Kill the Indian" was the motto that was used by these schools as they stripped Native children of their language, culture and identity. Learn how the schools operated and what Native Americans did to help overcome the abuse.

This webinar is presented by the AASLH Educators and Interpreters Affinity Community.

Learning Outcomes

  • An understanding of the boarding school system
  • An understanding of intergenerational trauma in Indian Country
  • An understanding of policy leading to boarding schools

Details

RECORDED DATE: July 20, 2021

COST: $5 AASLH Members / $15 Nonmembers / FREE for STEPS participants with promo code found in the online STEPS Community

ACCESS: You will be provided with instructions on how to access the live event upon registration.

STEPS Standard

This webinar will help organizations enrolled in STEPS* address Interpretation Standard 9 (New Workbook): The institution’s interpretive content is based on appropriate research which is conducted according to scholarly standards. 

*Standards and Excellence Program for History Organizations (STEPS) is a self-study, self-paced assessment tool designed specifically for small- to mid-sized history organizations, including volunteer-run institutions. Through a workbook, online resources, and an online community, organizations enrolled in STEPS review their policies and practices and benchmark themselves against national standards.

Recording and Captioning

This recording contains captions. 

How to Register

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Heather Bruegl

Heather Bruegl, a member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and first line descendant Stockbridge Munsee, is a graduate of Madonna University in Michigan and holds a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in U.S. History. Inspired by a trip to Wounded Knee, South Dakota, a passion for Native American History was born. She has spoken for numerous groups including the University of Michigan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of the Menominee Nation, the Kenosha Civil War Museum, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of the Mohicans, and the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. She has spoken at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh for Indigenous Peoples Day 2017. Heather also opened up and spoke at the Women’s March Anniversary in Lansing, Michigan in January 2018. She also spoke at the first ever Indigenous Peoples March in Washington, DC in January of 2019. In the summer 2019 and virtually in 2020, she spoke at the Crazy Horse Memorial and Museum in Custer, South Dakota for their Talking Circle Series. 

She has also become the ‘’accidental activist’’ and speaks to different groups about intergenerational racism and trauma and helps to bring awareness to our environment, the fight for clean water and other issues in the Native community. A curiosity of her own heritage lead her to Wisconsin, where she has researched the history of the Native American tribes in the area. She served as the Director of Cultural Affairs for the Stockbridge Munsee Community in Bowler, Wisconsin, before recently becoming Director of Education for the Forge Project in Taghkanic, New York. In addition to that she also currently travels and speaks on Native American history, including policy and activism.

Click here for instructions on how to register yourself or another user for this event. 

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Cancellation/Refunds for onsite workshops must be submitted in writing via email to learn@aaslh.org or mail to 2021 21st Ave S., Suite 320 Nashville, TN 37212. Cancellations made prior to the early-bird registration deadline date will receive a full refund. Cancellations made between the early-bird deadline date and eight days prior to the workshop will be subject to a $55 processing/materials charge. No refunds will be given within seven days of the workshop date. AASLH is not responsible for cancellations that were mailed or emailed but never received.

Cancellations/Refunds for online professional development (webinars and online courses) must be submitted in writing via email to learn@aaslh.org or mail to 2021 21st Ave S., Suite 320 Nashville, TN 37212. Cancellations made prior to the start date for the online course or the day of the webinar will be given a full refund. No refund will be given after the start date for the online course or on/after the day of the webinar. Registrants may transfer their registration to another person. Registrations cannot be transferred between courses or course sessions. AASLH is not responsible for cancellations that were mailed or emailed but never received.

If you have any questions, please contact AASLH Professional Development staff at learn@aaslh.org or 615-320-3203.