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  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Risk Assessment in Historic Houses

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Historic House Call: Risk Assessment in Historic Houses is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about unique issues in historic house preservation needs, especially in terms of disaster preparedness. This event is presented by Samantha Forsko and is part of the Historic House Call webinar series, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee.

    Historic House Call: Risk Assessment in Historic Houses is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about  unique issues in historic house preservation needs, especially in terms of disaster preparedness. This event is presented by Samantha Forsko and is part of the Historic House Call webinar series, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee. Historic houses present unique issues in their preservation needs, especially in terms of disaster preparedness. This webinar explores those needs through a discussion of hazards, risk assessments and evaluations, and mitigation methods – all with a focus on historic houses.


    Samantha Forsko is the Preservation Specialist at the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts (CCAHA), where she primarily works with institutions and their collections. She conducts on-site preservation needs and risk assessments and assists with preservation and emergency planning. She also develops and presents educational programs and provides technical information to libraries, archives, museums, historic sites, and other cultural institutions.  Since starting at the Center in 2015, Samantha has also been the project manager of the Pennsylvania Cultural Resilience Network (PaCRN), aiming to improve emergency response and preparedness for cultural institutions across the state. Before joining CCAHA, Samantha worked at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as a collections manager. In addition to providing long-term care for the nearly 200,000 permanent collection objects owned by LACMA, she also served on the Emergency Preparedness Committee, responsible for writing, updating, and training the 300 member staff on the implementation of the institution’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan. She has previously worked as a conservation technician for the Regional Arts and Culture Council and Cascadia Art Conservation Center, both in Portland, Oregon, primarily providing preventive maintenance and care for outdoor public art collections. Samantha received her MA in Arts Management with a focus on Archival and Museum Studies from Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California, writing her master’s thesis on Emergency Preparedness in Cultural Institutions.

  • Recorded Webinar: History Check-In: Immigration and Citizenship During the WWI Era

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/05/2018

    History Check-In: Immigration and Citizenship During the WWI Era is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about immigration and citizenship in the United States during the World War I era. This webinar is presented by Michael Innis-Jimenez. The History Check-In webinar series is presented in partnership with the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

    In this History Check-in webinar, Michael Innis-Jiménez provides an overview of immigration and citizenship during the World War I era with an emphasis on Mexican immigration. Just as immigration and racialized immigrants are at the forefront of today’s national political discourse, Innis-Jiménez will explain why the debate about immigrants and immigration was influential in shaping discourse during the earlier era. This webinar will also outline the push and pull influences in the changing immigration patterns and discuss how Mexican immigration to the U.S. influenced the broader, post-World War I immigrant demographics. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: Monday, November 5, 2018

    COST: $10 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $20 Non-members

    Description & Outcomes:

    Participant Outcomes:

    After this webinar, participants will:

    • Be able to explain and evaluate the major themes and developments of immigration to the United States in the World War I era.
    • Be familiar with political and social influences on immigration patterns to the United States in the World War I era.
    • Be able to trace the influence of historical Mexican immigrant stereotypes on immigration.

    Speaker:

    Headshot_Innis-Jimenez-Mike-130x150Michael Innis-Jiménez has a PhD in history from the University of Iowa. He is associate professor and director of graduate studies in the department of American Studies at the University of Alabama.  I have also served as a consultant and team member with the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute’s Latino New South Project and consultant with the Levine Museum of the New South (Charlotte, NC), the lead museum of the Latino New South Project’s three-museum consortium.  Innis-Jiménez’ books include Steel Barrio: The Great Mexican Migration to South Chicago, 1915-1940 (NYU Press, 2013) and Made in Chicago: Mexican Food, Tourism, and Cultural Identity (under contract with the University of Texas Press, in progress). Both books focus on the World War I through interwar periods.

  • Recorded Webinar: History Check-In: Native American Activism

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/11/2018

    History Check-In: Native American Activism is an AASLH Continuing Education webinar recorded on December 11, 2018. This webinar is about Native American activism. It is presented by Philip Deloria and is part of the History Check-In webinar series, presented in partnership with the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

    In this History Check-in webinar, Philip Deloria provides an overview of Native American activism. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Participants will develop an understanding of the range of political philosophies and strategies that have characterized Native American activism, including protest, public address, written appeals, petitions, legal work, ally-ship, among others).
    • Participants will develop an understanding of the long trajectory of activism, within and against distinct strategies of landtaking and settler colonialism.
    • Participants will be able to link understandings of the breadth and depth of Indian activism to specific recent manifestations, including the American Indian Movement and the Standing Rock resistance.

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: Tuesday, December 11, 2018

    COST: $10 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $20 Non-members

    Speaker:

    Headshot_Deloria-PhilipPhilip Deloria is a professor of history at Harvard University. His research and teaching focus on the cultural and ideological intersections of Indian and non-Indian worlds. His first book, Playing Indian (1998), traces the tradition of white "Indian play" from the Boston Tea Party to the New Age movement, while his Indians in Unexpected Places (2004) examines the ideologies surrounding Indian people in the early twentieth century and the ways Native Americans challenged them through sports, travel, automobility, and film and musical performance. He is a coeditor, with Neal Salisbury, of The Blackwell Companion to American Indian History (2001) and, with Jerome Bernstein, of C.G. Jung and the Sioux Traditions (2009) by Vine Deloria Jr. His most recent book, coauthored with Alexander Olson, is American Studies: A User's Guide (2017), which offers a comprehensive treatment of the historiography and methodology of the field of American Studies. Prior to joining the faculty at Harvard, Deloria taught at the University of Colorado and at the University of Michigan where he also served as the associate dean for undergraduate education and directed the American culture and Native American studies programs. He is a trustee of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, where he chairs the Repatriation Committee; a former president of the American Studies Association; and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is currently completing a project on American Indian visual arts of the mid-twentieth century and coediting, with Beth Piatote, "I Heart Nixon: Essays on the Indigenous Everyday."

  • Recorded Webinar: History Check-In: The Lost Cause: The Confederacy's Most Enduring Myth

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History Check-In: The Lost Cause: The Confederacy's Most Enduring Myth is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the origins and effects of the Lost Cause. This event is presented by Caroline E. Janney.

    History Check-In: The Lost Cause: The Confederacy's Most Enduring Myth is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the origins and effects of the Lost Cause. This event is presented by Caroline E. Janney. This webinar explores the origins and effects of the Lost Cause. The term “Lost Cause” has received a great deal of media attention lately in discussions of removing Confederate monuments. But what does it mean? Who promoted it? Why? How and why does it still capture the American imagination? In a survey of the period between 1865 and the present, this webinar examines the ways in which this “best case scenario” of the Confederacy was crafted and imparted as well as the ways in which it still resonates today. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). The webinar is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    About the Presenter:

    Caroline E. Janney is professor of history at Purdue University. A specialist in the Civil War era, she is the author of Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies’ Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008) and Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation, a volume in the Littlefield History of the Civil War Era Series (Littlefield Fund for Southern History and University of North Carolina Press, 2013), which has been selected for the History Book Club and Military Book Club and won the Charles S. Sydnor Award by the Southern Historical Association and the Jefferson Davis Award by the American Civil War Museum.

    In addition to her monographs, Janney is the editor of Petersburg to Appomattox: The End of the War in Virginia and John Richard Dennett’s, The South As It Is, 1865-66. She is likewise co-editor with Gary W. Gallagher of Cold Harbor to the Crater: The End of the Overland Campaign. She is the author of essays about the Civil War and its aftermath that have appeared in the Journal of Southern HistoryCivil War History, the Virginia Magazine of History and BiographyCrucible of the Civil WarVirginia from Secession to CommemorationVirginia’s Civil War, the Journal of the Civil War Era and numerous other collections.

    An active public speaker, she has given presentations at locations such as the Lincoln Presidential Library, Clinton Presidential Library, Huntington Library, Gettysburg College’s Civil War Institute, and has appeared on C-SPAN as well as NPR. She is a speaker with the Organization of American Historians’ Distinguished Lectureship program and a recipient of the Kenneth T. Kofmehl Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award from Purdue’s College of Liberal Arts. She serves as a co-editor of the University of North Carolina Press’s Civil War America Series and is the past president of the Society of Civil War Historians.

  • Recorded Webinar: History Check-In: Women's Suffrage

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/23/2018

    History Check-In: Women's Suffrage is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the history of woman suffrage in the United States and the Nineteenth Amendment. This event is presented by Susan Ware.

    History Check-In: Women's Suffrage is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the history of woman suffrage in the United States and the Nineteenth Amendment. This event is presented by Susan Ware. This AASLH webinar presents a general introduction to the history of woman suffrage in the United States, organizing in the theme of "the long Nineteenth Amendment," to puts women's struggle for the vote in conversation with other movements for democracy and equality across the sweep of American history. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). The webinar is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    Details:

    RECORD DATE: Tuesday, October 23, 2018

    COST: $20 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $30 Non-members

    Description & Outcomes

    In this webinar, Susan Ware presents a general introduction to the history of woman suffrage in the United States, timed to coincide with the many commemorative events planned around the centennial of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment on August 26, 2020. Its organizing theme is "the long Nineteenth Amendment."  Just as historians talk about a long nineteenth century stretching from the American Revolution through the early twentieth century, or a long civil rights movement that predates the activism of the 1950s and 1960s, a focus on the long Nineteenth Amendment allows us to start the story before the iconic Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and extend it beyond the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920.  Among other outcomes, this broader approach to suffrage history puts women's struggle for the vote in conversation with other movements for democracy and equality across the sweep of American history.

    Participant Outcomes:

    • familiarity with the main themes and major players of the national suffrage movement
    • awareness of regional differences:  how the story played out on state and local levels, with special attention to the South and West
    • an understanding of the central role of race in the woman suffrage movement, both the active roles played by African American suffragists and the evidence of racism on the part of white women in the movement
    • a framework for linking the suffrage movement to contemporary events by not seeing 1920 as a hard stop or the end of the story, but as part of a continuum of ongoing and contested questions about gender, citizenship, and the vote.

    Speaker:

    A blond woman with bangs and round glasses smiles at the camera. She wears a sweater and scarf, is visible from slightly below the shoulders, and stands in front of a brick windowed building.A pioneer in the field of women’s history and a leading feminist biographer, Susan Ware is the author and editor of numerous books on twentieth-century U.S. history. Educated at Wellesley College and Harvard University, she has taught at New York University and Harvard, where she served as editor of the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: Completing the Twentieth Century (2004). Since 2012, she has served as the general editor of the American National Biography, published by Oxford University Press under the auspices of the American Council of Learned Societies. Ware has long been associated with the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and is currently writing a book of suffrage stories inspired by its collections.

  • Recorded Webinar: History Crash Course: The American Experience in WWI

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History Crash Course: The American Experience in WWI is an AASLH continuing education recorded webinar. This webinar is presented by Jennifer D. Keene and is part of the History Crash Course webinar series, presented in partnership with the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

    This lecture webinar offers a brief overview of current scholarship on the American experience in World War I, the key challenges facing smaller historical organizations seeking to mount exhibits on the war, some strategies for placing objects in their proper historical context, and ways to underscore the relevance of WWI for American society today. 

     RECORDED DATE: March 28, 2017

    About the Lecturer:

    Jennifer D. Keene is a professor of history and chair of the History Department at Chapman University. She is a specialist in American military experience during World War I.  She has published three books on the American involvement in the First World War: Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (2001), World War I: The American Soldier Experience (2011), and The United States and the First World War (2000).  She is the lead author for an American history textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States that uses a visual approach to teaching students U.S. history. She is also a general editor for the “1914-1918-online,” peer-reviewed online encyclopedia, http://www.1914-1918-online.net/, a major digital humanities project.  

     The History Crash Course Webinar Series is conducted in partnership with the Organization of American Historians. We invite you to find out more about OAH by visiting their website here.


  • Recorded Webinar: History Relevance Coffee Break with Detroit Historical Society

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/09/2019

    History Relevance Coffee Break with Detroit Historical Society is an AASLH Continuing Education webinar recorded on May 9, 2019. This webinar is about how the Detroit Historical Society is making history relevant by connecting the past to the present. This webinar is presented by Kalisha Davis and Max van Balgooy and is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series, presented in partnership with the History Relevance initiative.

    Take a coffee break to think about the relevance of history with Kalisha Davis of Detroit Historical Society and Max van Balgooy of Engaging Places, LLCand the History Relevance Initiative. During this thirty minute interview and Q&A session, Kalisha and Max discuss Detroit Historical Society's ongoing project Detroit '67: Looking Back to Move ForwardThey focus in particular on how to build and sustain relationships with individuals and institutions in your community.

    This webinar is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series. Each webinar in this short-form series showcases projects by history organizations that are making history relevant to their communities in meaningful, measurable, and replicable ways. Webinar participants will glean practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the present and meet their relevance goals.

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: May 9, 2018

    COST: $Free AASLH Members / $5 Non-members

    Description and Outcomes:

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Learn how Detroit Historical Society makes history relevant in measurable and replicable ways
    • Feel motivated to think creatively about how they can make history relevant through projects at their own institution
    • Learn practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the present

    Speakers:

    • Kalisha Davis, Director of Community Outreach & Engagement, Detroit Historical Society
    • Max van Balgooy, Principal, Engaging Places, LLC; Steering Committee Member, History Relevance
  • Recorded Webinar: History Relevance Coffee Break with Ford's Theatre

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/13/2018

    History Relevance Coffee Break with Ford's Theatre is an AASLH Continuing Education online event originally presented live on December 13, 2018. This webinar is about how the Ford's Theatre is making history relevant by connecting the past to the present. This webinar is presented by David McKenzie and Conny Graft and is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series, presented in partnership with the History Relevance initiative.

    Take a coffee break with David McKenzie of Ford's Theatre and Conny Graft of the History Relevance initiative. During this thirty-minute interview, David and Conny discuss the challenges faced and lessons learned during Ford's Theatre's prototyping project

    This webinar is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series. Each webinar in this short-form series showcases projects by history organizations that are making history relevant to their communities in meaningful, measurable, and replicable ways. Webinar participants will glean practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the present and meet their relevance goals.

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: Thursday, December 13, 2018

    COST: $Free Members / $5 Non-members

    Description and Outcomes:

    Interview Questions:

    • Tell us about how you connected issues of the past with issues of the present?
    • What were some of the challenges you faced in implementing this project?
    • What did you learn from the evaluation of your project?
    • Based on your experience making history relevant through this project, what are the three most important suggestions you have for others working to make history relevant at their institutions?

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Learn how Ford's Theatre makes history relevant in measurable and replicable ways
    • Feel inspired by the featured organization to endorse the Value of History Statement and employ formal survey and evaluation techniques when evaluating the success of their projects
    • Feel motivated to think creatively about how they can make history relevant through projects at their own institution
    • Learn practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the presents

    Speakers:

    • Conny Graft, Steering Committee Member, History Relevance Initiative
    • David McKenzie, Associate Director for Interpretive Resources, Ford's Theatre

  • Recorded Webinar: History Relevance Coffee Break with Washington State Historical Society

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/29/2018

    History Relevance Coffee Break with Washington State Historical Society is an AASLH Continuing Education online event on November 29, 2018. This live webinar is about how the Washington State Historical Society is making history relevant by connecting the past to the present. This webinar is presented by Gwen Whiting and Elisabeth Marsh and is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series, presented in partnership with the History Relevance initiative.

    Take a coffee break with Gwen Whiting of Washington State Historical Society and Elisabeth Marsh of the Organization of American Historians and the History Relevance initiative. During this thirty-minute interview, Gwen and Elisabeth discuss the challenges faced and lessons learned in the development of Washington State Historical Society's new permanent exhibit, "Washington, My Home."

    This webinar is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series. Each webinar in this short-form series showcases projects by history organizations that are making history relevant to their communities in meaningful, measurable, and replicable ways. Webinar participants will glean practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the present and meet their relevance goals.

    Details:

    RECORDING DATE: Thursday, November 29, 2018

    COST: $Free Members / $5 Non-members

    Description and Outcomes:

    Interview Questions:

    • Tell us about how you connected issues of the past with issues of the present?
    • What were some of the challenges you faced in implementing this project?
    • What did you learn from the evaluation of your project?
    • Based on your experience making history relevant through this project, what are the three most important suggestions you have for others working to make history relevant at their institutions?

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Learn how Washington State Historical Society makes history relevant in measurable and replicable ways
    • Feel inspired by the featured organization to endorse the Value of History Statement and employ formal survey and evaluation techniques when evaluating the success of their projects
    • Feel motivated to think creatively about how they can make history relevant through projects at their own institution
    • Learn practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the presents

    Speakers:

    • Elisabeth Marsh, Director of Membership and Program Development, Organization of American Historians; Steering Committee Member, History Relevance Initiative
    • Gwen Whiting, Lead Curator, Washington State Historical Society
  • Recorded Webinar: How to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fundraising

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    How to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fundraising is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the benefits of proactive, strategic fundraising. This event is presented by Jamie Simek and David Janssen.

    How to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fundraising is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the benefits of proactive, strategic fundraising. This event is presented by Jamie Simek and David Janssen. Although fundraising is critical and necessary to nonprofit work, staff and volunteers often have a less than favorable opinion of the process. In museums and historical organizations of all sizes, fundraising myths, biases and misunderstandings can make us uncomfortable and ineffective. However, fundraising is not exclusively reserved for development staff and board committees. We can all benefit our institutions by better understanding the process, how it functions in our organizations and how we can help improve the outcomes. This webinar will discuss the benefits of proactive, strategic fundraising. Whether at an all-volunteer organization, a small shop with limited staff or a larger institution with dedicated development officers, there are always tactics to produce better results. By applying basic fundraising principles and best practices, and learning from the experiences of colleagues, we can build better relationships with current and future supporters. We can stop worrying and embrace fund development.

    About the Instructors:

    Jamie Simek

    Jamie Simek helps organizations get organized. As an educator, she has helped small groups--from student organizations to alumni chapters to local history organizations-- build capacity and improve their programming from the inside out. Jamie’s 15 year career in organization and constituent relations includes stops in university and alumni relations, student organization advising, veterans services and development research . In her current position with Local History Services at the Indiana Historical Society (IHS), she is responsible for developing and implementing the fundraising education program for the IHS Heritage Support Grants program. She holds a Master of Science in Education from Purdue University, where she also earned her bachelor's degree.

    David Janssen

    David Janssen has over 25 years’ experience in museum and historic site leadership at both large and small institutions. He has served as the executive director of Brucemore, a property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, since 2012. He also served as Vice President of Collections and Interpretation at the Detroit Historical Society; Vice President of Internal Operations at Edsel & Eleanor Ford House; and as Curator of the Smith-McDowell House Museum. He earned a BA in history from Dartmouth College, an MA in history from Duquesne University, and an MBA from the University of Iowa – and is also a 2008 graduate of the Seminar for Historical Administration.