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  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites Webinar

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites Webinar is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance. This event is taught by Michelle Moon and AASLH.

    Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites Webinar is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance. This event is taught by Michelle Moon and AASLH. Food is such a friendly topic that it’s often thought of as a “hook” for engaging visitors to museums and historic sites—a familiar way into other topic, or a sensory element to round out a living history interpretation. But food is more than just a hook—it’s a topic all its own, with its own history and its own uncertain future, and deserving of a central place in historic interpretation.

    With audiences more interested in food than ever before, and new research in food studies bringing interdisciplinary approaches to this complicated but compelling subject, museums and historic sites have an opportunity to draw new audiences and infuse new meaning into their food presentations. This Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide an introduction to strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance, making relevant connections to contemporary issues and visitor interests. Join Michelle Moon and AASLH as we discuss how the field can better use our love of food to share our love of history.


  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about an introduction to interpreting LGBT history at museums and historic sites and first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts. This event is presented by Dr. Susan Ferentinos.

    Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about an introduction to interpreting LGBT history at museums and historic sites and  first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts. This event is presented by Dr. Susan Ferentinos. We will discuss first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts, which include: deciding if the time is right for your organization to interpret LGBT history; approaching the sources; conceptualizing your story; and trust-building. Drawing on numerous case studies, Dr. Ferentinos will offer a range of success stories and suggest what we can learn from these examples.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for engaging with Native Americans beyond the legal framework of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). This event is presented by Raney Bench.

    Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for engaging with Native Americans beyond the legal framework of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). This event is presented by Raney Bench. Many museums and historic sites pride themselves on telling inclusive stories about the histories of the people in the communities they serve. Institutions often collaborate with groups within those communities to create better exhibitions and programming. But, when there is a long history of exclusion and disenfranchisement within the museum framework, as is the case for the numerous Native nations and First Nations tribes of North America, how can cultural institutions make efforts to have better relationships with these historically under-served communities? In today’s world, how can we provide space for and elevation to the voices of those who have been historically silenced?

    The Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide strategies for engaging with Native Americans beyond the legal framework of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), in order to work collaboratively, share authority, and incorporate multiple ways of knowing about the past into all interpretation about Native people, objects, histories, and cultures. Raney Bench will provide insight and methods on how best to purposefully work to incorporate the history, culture, and perspectives of indigenous peoples into your institutions’ interpretative programming.

    About the Speaker

    Raney Bench is the Executive Director of the Seal Cove Automotive Museum in Seal Cove, Maine. Raney Bench has a Bachelors of Art in Native American Studies and a Master of Arts in Museum Studies. She has worked with Native communities and small museums throughout the United States for almost 20 years. Raney is the author of Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites, published by AASLH in 2014.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This event is presented by Kristin Gallas.

    Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This event is presented by Kristin Gallas. Do you interpret the institution of slavery or the lives of enslaved people at your historic site/museum? Join us as we share the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This webinar will help you achieve a greater understanding of the difficult knowledge and complicated emotions surrounding this complex history.

    Kristin Gallas is a consultant with the Tracing Center on Histories and Legacies of Slavery, overseeing the design of workshops for educators and public history professionals. She is the co-editor of Interpreting Slavery at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, January 2015), among other publications on best practices in the interpretation of slavery. She has led the education/interpretation departments at the Montana Historical Society, the USS Constitution Museum, and currently at the Tsongas Industrial History Center.

  • Recorded Webinar: Introduction to Podcasting for Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/14/2018

    What is a podcast, who listens to podcasts, and why should history organizations care? Introduction to Podcasting for Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how to create a podcast and plan for podcasting for history museums, historic sites, and history organization. This webinar is presented by Hannah Hethmon.

    What is a podcast, who listens to podcasts, and why should history organizations care? In this AASLH Continuing Education webinar, Hannah Hethmon, AASLH alumna and host of the podcast #MuseumsInStrangePlaces, introduces podcasting for history museums, historic sites, and history organization. Participants in this webinar will learn how podcasting is being used by museums, what it takes to produce their own podcast, how they can decide if podcasting is right for them, and how to get started making a quality podcast on a small budget. This webinar is a great introduction or refresher for history organizations considering creating a podcast or interested in freshening up their existing podcast practice. Participants will also receive a Resource List with information on equipment, storytelling, editing, promotion, training opportunities, and more, as well as a Podcast Planning Worksheet for those inspired to start their own podcasts.

    Details:

    Recording Date: August 14, 2018

    Outcomes:

    • Participants will have a good understanding of the medium of podcasting and how it is being used (and can be used) by museums
    • Participants will be able to make an educated decision about whether or not they should have a podcast at their museum, whether they should produce in-house or out-source, and other options for using the medium to further their mission without creating their own podcast.
    • Participants who do want to start their own podcast will have a checklist for getting started and be able to create a plan and budget for their own podcast.
    • Participants who want to start a podcast will be equipped to make a strong case to stakeholders and know where to find more advanced information.

    Speaker:

    Hannah Hethmon is the producer of Museums in Strange Places, an AAM award-winning podcast that explores the world through it’s museums. She just finished a nine-month Fulbright fellowship in Iceland studying language and museums. Prior to that, she worked as AASLH’s Membership Marketing Coordinator. Currently living in Warsaw, Poland, Hannah is a native of the greater D.C. area and holds an M.A. in Medieval Icelandic Studies. She is passionate about helping museums communicate effectively and meaningfully with their audiences. Find her on Twitter @hannah_rfh.

  • Recorded Webinar: Is Your Museum Grant Ready?

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/04/2018

    Is Your Museum Grant Ready? is an AASLH Continuing Education webinar recorded on June 4, 2018. This webinar is about self-assessing your institution’s grant-readiness. It is presented by Sarah Sutton of Sustainable Museums.

    Sarah Sutton offers a guide to self-assessing your institution’s grant-readiness and steps for bringing yourselves up to par. This 75-minute webinar reviews the institutional structures, policies, information, and practices that make museums competitive in the grants game. This webinar is adapted from Sarah’s book of the same title. Sarah Sutton narrates a step-by-step process for collecting and sharing this information, and provide examples of good practice. 

    Note: Technical issues were experienced during the original live recording of this webinar. This product is an audio-only re-recording of the presentation provided by the speaker. Slides from the original presentation are available in this product to accompany the audio recording. 

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: June 4, 2018

    COST: $15 Members / $30 Nonmembers

    Participant Outcomes:

    • How to interact with the funder in a highly-professional and cooperative manner
    • What types of information describe audiences adequately, and demonstrate program needs and effectiveness
    • What experience and examples can highlight your institution’s value and impact
    • How to illustrate your institution’s quality as a program provider and as a reliable grant partner

    Recommended audience: 
    Those new to proposal-writing, and applicants who have been unsuccessful attracting grants for a new program or organization, or for the first few times pursuing grants.

    Speaker:

    Sarah Sutton

    Sarah Sutton leads Sustainable Museums, a consultancy helping staff and leadership of cultural and natural resource organizations plan for a more sustainable future. She and her team work with museums, historic sites, zoos, gardens, and aquariums to identify and pursue greener approaches in programs, operations, and building and site management. All of her work includes helping the institution make a difference in its community. Sarah has worked in the museum field for over thirty years, and sustainability work for the last decade. She is a LEED-Accredited Professional and a Green Globes Professional and she writes about environmental sustainability in print and online. Her publications include Environmental Sustainability at Historic Sites and Museums and The Green Nonprofit: The First 52 Weeks of Your Green Journey. She is co-author of both editions of The Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Sustainability (published under the name Sarah S. Brophy.)

  • Recorded Webinar: Is Your Organization Ready for StEPs?

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/01/2019

    Is Your Organization Ready for StEPs? is an AASLH continuing education event presented by Cherie Cook, AASLH Senior Program Manager. Register for this free, one-hour webinar to hear how StEPs can help your organization create a road map for meaningful change. This webinar is for organizations that are considering using the StEPs program. Organizations already enrolled in the program should register for the free webinar, “StEPs Welcome (or Refresher).

    Assessment programs like AASLH’s StEPs program are road maps. They are a valuable tool for moving an organization forward along a path and helping paid and unpaid staff, volunteers, and board members stay focused as they travel together along that path toward a set of common goals.  

    Organizations that can connect planning and fundraising to an assessment program gain credibility. Funders like to know that your proposed project is based upon goals that are supported by an assessment program, and that your organization’s progress can be measured.

    StEPs is a self-study assessment program open to any museum, historical society, historic house, site, or related organization. It is intended for small- and mid-sized organizations that do not feel ready for other assessment programs, but larger museums may find it useful for prioritizing and as a refresher checklist or training tool. Enrollment in StEPs is a one-time fee of $175 for institutional members of AASLH.

    Is your organization ready for StEPs? Join us for this free, one-hour webinar to hear how StEPs can help your organization create a road map for meaningful change.

    Speaker: Cherie Cook, AASLH Senior Program Manager

    Note: This webinar is for organizations that are considering using the StEPs program. Organizations already enrolled in the program should register for the free webinar, “StEPs Welcome or Refresher" on June 19, 2019: https://learn.aaslh.org/p/event-stepswelcome-2019jun. The StEPs Bonus mentioned in the webinar is valid for May 2019. 

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: May 1, 2019

    COST: FREE

  • Recorded Webinar: Lights, Cameras, Action, Oh My! Filming at Your Historic Site

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Lights, Cameras, Action, Oh My! Filming at Your Historic Site is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about providing resources, sharing dos and don’ts, and answering questions associated with filming. This event is presented by Jessica VanLanduyt and Joshua Campbell Torrance and is part of the Historic House Call webinar series.

    Lights, Cameras, Action, Oh My! Filming at Your Historic Site is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about providing resources, sharing dos and don’ts, and answering questions associated with filming. This event is presented by Jessica VanLanduyt and Joshua Campbell Torrance and is part of the Historic House Call webinar series. Historic sites are continuously looking for new revenue sources. Commercial filming has the potential to earn additional income and give your site great exposure. However, there are a lot of factors to consider, and guidelines to set in place, before signing the contract. This historic house call intends to provide resources, share dos and don’ts, and answer questions associated with filming. 

    Listen in and chat with Jessica VanLanduyt, Historic House Manager at the Atlanta History Center and AASLH Historic House Committee member, as she shares her experience with filming at two historic houses, and provides tips and resources for dealing with all aspects of film shoots. Jessica has supervised two feature film shoots, reality and television shows, an art film, and news media filming. Swan House is President Snow’s Executive Mansion in three of four Hunger Games films, has been featured in The Amazing Race 19, Vampire Diaries, and numerous reality television shows. AASLH Historic House Committee member, Joshua Campbell Torrance will serve as moderator and provide additional insight from his experience with filming.

  • Recorded Webinar: Making History Relevant

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Making History Relevant is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how history can have more impact when it connects the people, events, places, stories, and ideas of the past with those that are important and meaningful to audiences today. This event is presented by John Dichtl.

    Making History Relevant is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how history can have more impact when it connects the people, events, places, stories, and ideas of the past with those that are important and meaningful to audiences today. This event is presented by John Dichtl. Why are we still talking about this?” “You get paid to do that?” “You need a degree for that?” Every history person knows that history – in theory, study, and practice – is often undervalued or discredited as irrelevant. We also know that “history” is truly inseparable from the “present.” AASLH’s own John Dichtl is a founding member of the History Relevance (HR) initiative, a group of history professionals posing questions about what makes the past relevant today. Join us for a discussion of how history can have more impact when it connects the people, events, places, stories, and ideas of the past with those that are important and meaningful to audiences today.

  • Recorded Webinar: Money Talks: How to Discuss Financial Information with Your Board

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Money Talks: How to Discuss Financial Information with Your Board is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about simple techniques you can implement to make budgets and other financial reports more understandable and accurate. This event is presented by Stacy Klingler and Laura Roberts. This webinar is part of the StEPs Lab series of continuing education offered to both StEPs program participants and all others interested in financial management. This is StEPs Lab 2.

    Money Talks: How to Discuss Financial Information with Your Board is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about simple techniques you can implement to make budgets and other financial reports more understandable and accurate. This event is presented by Stacy Klingler and Laura Roberts. People say that money talks. Too often, however, people don’t want to talk about money. People often shy away from talking about finances beyond a cursory approval of the budget and financial reports until there is a crisis. Ongoing monitoring and conversations about finances are the foundation of a healthy organization.

    In this webinar, we discuss simple techniques you can implement to make budgets and other financial reports more understandable and accurate. We also discuss important questions board members should ask when reviewing them. Speakers for the event are Stacy Klingler, formerly Director of Local History Services, Indiana Historical Society (now Executive Director of the William Butterworth Foundation), and Laura Roberts, Principal, Roberts Consulting.

    With the purchase of this webinar, you will also receive a free download of the two-part technical leaflet, “Building Better Budgets” by Klingler and Roberts.

    Paid and unpaid staff and board members from organizations of all sizes, especially smaller ones will benefit from the information presented in this recording. Participants enrolled in AASLH’s StEPs program will benefit from a discussion on how they can meet finance-related performance indicators. 

    This webinar is part of the StEPs Lab series of continuing education offered to both StEPs program  participants and all others interested in financial management. This is StEPs Lab 2.

    Applying what you learn in a Lab to your policies and practices helps your organization make meaningful progress. The more progress you make, the more boxes you can check off in the StEPs workbook. The more boxes you check off, the more Bronze, Silver, and Gold certificates your organization earns. And that translates into more credibility, more support, and an organization that is a valuable asset to its community for many more years to come.