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  • Online Course: Introduction to Financial Management (Fall 2019)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    SEPT. 30 - OCT. 27, 2019 | Introduction to Financial Management is an AASLH online course presented by instructor Rebeka Beaulieu. This four-week course provides an introduction to financial concepts, from understanding expenses and income to how to establish an endowment. Successful completion of this course will earn one credit toward the Small Museum Pro! certificate from AASLH.​

    An AASLH Small Museum Pro! Online Course

    Course Description 

    Designed for staff and volunteers of all abilities and organizations of all sizes, this four-week course provides an accessible, clear, and even fun introduction to financial concepts. From understanding expenses and income to how to establish an endowment, this course will equip you with a toolkit to engage with finance on your terms and to your ability.   

    Over the four weeks, students will participate in dynamic discussions, review relevant and timely case studies and readings, and ultimately build a real, usable budget tailored to their organization’s needs.  

    Participant Outcomes 

    At the end of this course you will:  

    • Understand processes related to budgets and basic financial systems in accordance with best practices  
    • Understand institutional financial planning, goal-setting, and analysis  
    • Bridge mission- and non-mission-based activities with financial outcomes 
    • Feel more comfortable and better equipped to create operational and special project budgets 

    Sample Curriculum

    • Week 1: Course overview, introduction to financial terms and definitions, explanation of income and expenses
    • Week 2: Overview of budgets including maintenance and evaluation, financial systems and structures
    • Week 3: The relationship between financial systems and mission, UBIT, and introduction to restricted and unrestricted funds
    • Week 4: Next steps for budgets, the right financial questions to ask and when to ask them

    Texts Used 

    Required: Financial Fundamentals for Historic House Museums, Rebekah Beaulieu, 2017

    Texts are NOT INCLUDED with your registration. You must order the book separately from the book seller of your choice.

    Details

    COURSE DATES: September 30 - October 27, 2019

    COST: $150 Members / $250 Nonmembers

    OPEN REGISTRATION: May 1 - September 25, 2019; 20 participant limit

    Course Logistics

    FORMAT: Online, weekly-paced course 

    LENGTH: 4 weeks 

    PARTICIPATION STYLE: Weekly real-time online chats (schedule to be determined based on student availability); weekly assignments; final course assignment; Students should expect to spend 2-5 hours per week on the course. 

    MATERIALS: One recommended text; students should bring real-life financial information to the course to be used in course assignments to create a budget. Students should also have Microsoft Excel or a similar spreadsheet program as it will be used extensively to complete assignments. Note: all institutional financial information will be kept confidential and shared only with the instructor. 

    CREDIT:Successful completion of this course (80% or higher) will earn one credit toward the Small Museum Pro! certificate from AASLH.

    Who Should Take This Course 

    Whether you have financial responsibilities at your organization, wish to build a skill set for a leadership position in the future, or simply want to better comprehend and contribute to financial decision-making, this course is for you.  

    Instructor

    Rebekah Beaulieu, Ph.D. is the Director of the Florence Griswold Museum, an art museum, National Landmark historic house, and 13-acres of gardens and grounds in Old Lyme, Connecticut. She serves on the faculty of AASLH’s History Leadership >span class="TextRun SCXW175450672 BCX0" xml:lang="EN-US" lang="EN-US"> is a member of the Association’s Finance Committee. Becky is also a board member of the New England Museum Association and Connecticut Humanities, and was recently appointed an AAM Accreditation Commissioner.   

    Becky is the author of Financial Fundamentals for Historic House Museums (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017). She holds an M.A in Art History and Museum Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and in Arts Administration from Columbia University; she earned her Ph.D. in American and New England Studies at Boston University.  

  • Online Course: Museum Education and Outreach (Fall 2019)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    SEPT. 9 - NOV. 1, 2019 | Museum Education and Outreach is an AASLH Continuing Education online course on September 9 - November 1, 2019. This online course is about how we can facilitate visitors’ meaningful and memorable experiences in the informal environments of museums. This course is taught by Tanya Brock and is a Small Museum Pro! online course.

    Museum and Education Outreach

    An AASLH Small Museum Pro! Online Course

    Course Description

    At their heart, regardless of type or size, museums are engaging, dynamic places of education. This AASLH online course, Museum Education and Outreach, is about how we can facilitate visitors’ meaningful and memorable experiences in the informal environments of museums.

    This course requires regular check-ins, sharing and commenting on peer work, and participation in scheduled live chats. Participants will help shape the flow of the course in addition to providing resources and insights on each other’s work. Assignments are made weekly to allow for regular feedback and dialogue. While work can be done at your own pace, meeting deadlines is encouraged to maximize the experience. Throughout the course you will develop a toolkit of strategies, policies, and documents ready for immediate implementation.

    Participant Outcomes

    At the end of this course you will be able to:

    • describe the characteristics and learning needs of various museum audiences;
    • summarize what we know about learning in museums;
    • assess the strengths and weaknesses of interpretive techniques and program approaches;
    • utilize a system for planning, operating, and evaluating museum educational programs;
    • access resources to assist you in future development of effective learning experiences

    Sample Curriculum

    • Week 1: Defining the Museum / Museums and Memory
    • Week 2: Interpretation Strengths, Weaknesses, and Best Practices
    • Week 3: Audiences and Identifying Your Key Ones
    • Week 4: Education Program Planning, Management, and Evaluation
    • Week 5: Organizing of Museum Education and Outreach
    • Week 6: Community Partners and Funding
    • Week 7: Leading Staff and Volunteers
    • Week 8: Action Plan for Future Programming at your Museum

    Texts Used

    Required:

    Anna Johnson, Kimberly A. Huber, Nancy Cutler, Melissa Bingmann and Tim Grove. The Museum Educator’s Manual: Educators Share Successful Techniques (2nd ed). The text is NOT INCLUDED with your registration. You must order the book separately from the book seller of your choice.

    Course Logistics

    FORMAT: Online, weekly-paced course

    LENGTH: 8 weeks

    PARTICIPATION STYLE: Bi-weekly (every-other-week) real-time online chats; weekly assignments; final course assignment

    MATERIALS: One required text (see below)

    CREDIT: Successful completion of this course will earn one credit toward the Small Museum Pro! certificate from AASLH.

    COURSE DATES: September 9 - November 1, 2019

    COST: $195 AASLH Members / $295 Nonmembers

    OPEN REGISTRATION: July 1 - September 5, 2019; 30 Participant limit

    Who Should Take This Course

    This course is a beginning level course designed for professional staff and volunteers of historical organizations and libraries with historical collections who have little to no experience with developing education programs and goals for museums. Successful participants should be ready to look past traditional methods and challenge themselves to work around site-specific hurdles.

    Instructor

    Tanya Brock is one who tends to take leaps and jumps rather than the straight path. Her career has spanned museum education, visitor services, exhibit planning, historical research, educational program consultant, and community partner liaison. Whether teaching food preservation classes or designing and running the nation’s first functioning historical brewery or running a brewpub co-op, her passion has always been centered on food—its power to unite and act as a storyteller for communities.

    Her education is a patchwork of cultural anthropology, food preservation, heritage interpretation, and museum administration. This background has built a foundation of various perspectives from which she draws from when designing programs. Over a 20-year period she has worked with audiences of all sizes, ages, and backgrounds yet believes at the end of the day, it is the guest who drives the conversation and the experience.

  • Online Course: Project Management for History Professionals (Fall 2019)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    SEPT. 9 - OCT. 6, 2019 | This AASLH online course shows you how to implement internationally recognized project management principles in a history/nonprofit context.

    Do you often juggle several projects, trying to keep each one focused and on track? Project management provides valuable training that will help you organize, manage, and successfully complete projects. This online course shows you how to implement internationally recognized project management principles in a history/nonprofit context.

    Details:

    DATES: September 9 – October 6, 2019

    COST: $350 AASLH members/$425 nonmembers

    OPEN REGISTRATION: August 2 - September 5, 2019; 25 person max

    Logistics:

    FORMAT: Online, self-paced weekly modules

    LENGTH: 4 weeks

    PARTICIPATION STYLE: Weekly online chats; Students should expect to spend 5-7 hours per week on the course

    MATERIALS: There are no required materials for this course. All materials will be provided within the online classroom.

    Description & Outcomes:

    Coursework will cover all of the details included in the four steps to successful project management:

    1. Define (creating a project charter, setting initial objectives, identifying risks and constraints, and more)
    2. Plan (developing a schedule, budget, etc.)
    3. Manage (providing feedback, negotiating for resources and resolving differences)
    4. Review (turning over deliverables, documentation and more)

    Using a real-life project they bring to the course, participants apply project management principles to complete a project charter and scope diagram they can then use to begin or continue their project in an efficient, orderly and open manner.

    This course consists of four modules that include assignments, quizzes, and other activities. While the first week’s module is guided, the rest are self-paced. Weekly online chats provide opportunities for students to interact with the instructor and each other.

    Students should expect to spend five to seven hours per week on the course.

    Who should attend:

    Project Management is valuable training for staff at all levels. Whether your work involves exhibitions, education and programs, planning, fundraising, collections, historic preservation or the many other tasks staff at history organizations address every day, you will gain new skills, ideas and tools for effectively managing projects.

    Participant Feedback:

    “Project management is usually discussed in terms of software development or construction management. It was so helpful to see its value within a humanities context. This is some of the best professional development I have ever experienced. Excellent instruction.” – 2015 participant

    Instructor:

    AASLH welcomes Gina Minks as its new project management instructor. For the past five years, Gina has had her own consulting business and taught project management classes for the University of North Texas. She has also taught for the Library Information Technology Association and the Society of American Archivists. Prior to that, she served as the Imaging and Preservation service manager for Amigos Library Services where she managed NEH grants. Gina is active in professional associations including her current service as a board member for the Society of American Archivists Foundation. She is also a member of the National Heritage Responders and has been part of disaster recovery after Hurricane Ike, Hurricane Wilma, and Super Storm Sandy.

  • Program Title

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    one - three sentences

    as long as you need

  • Recorded Webinar: 2014 OLC - Museum Management Tune Up Webinar

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Museum Management Tune Up Webinar is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about new skills in employee assessment and review, communication, time management, and work relationships. This event is presented by Trevor Jones and Linnea Grim and is part of the 2014 Online Conference recordings.

    Museum Management Tune Up Webinar is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about new skills in employee assessment and review, communication, time management, and work relationships. This event is presented by Trevor Jones and Linnea Grim and is part of the 2014 Online Conference recordings. Are you as good of a manager as you want to be? Could you use a refresher on how good management techniques can improve the productivity of your history organization’s paid and unpaid staff? Join us for a practical webinar geared toward history professionals that will help you learn new skills in employee assessment and review, communication, time management, and work relationships.

    Don’t expect management theory – Trevor and Linnea will provide real world practical tools and specific concrete examples of behaviors participants can use today in historic sites and museums to create healthier, more productive, and happier work environments. 

    Presenters:

    Trevor Jones, Director, Museum Collections and Exhibitions, Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, KY 

    Linnea Grim, Hunter J, Smith Director of Education and Visitor Programs, Monticello, Charlottesville, VA.

  • Recorded Webinar: 2016 OLC - Breaking the Mold: Reimagining Traditional Museum Collections

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Breaking the Mold: Reimagining Traditional Museum Collections is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how three institutions are rethinking how they operate in order to reach new audiences, maintain relevancy, and create advocates for history. This event is presented by Alexandra Rasic and was part of the 2016 Online Conference.

    Breaking the Mold: Reimagining Traditional Museum Collections is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how three institutions are rethinking how they operate in order to reach new audiences, maintain relevancy, and create advocates for history. This event is presented by  Alexandra Rasic and was part of the 2016 Online Conference. From tweaking programming to breaking the operational mold, ideas and tips will be shared to inspire staff at institutions large and small.

    Chair: Alexandra Rasic, Director of Public Programs, Homestead Museum, City of Industry, CA 

    This webinar was recorded as part of the 2016 Online Conference for the Annual Meeting in Detroit, MI.

  • Recorded Webinar: 2016 OLC - Deconstructing "Safe Space"

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Deconstructing "Safe Space" is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about taking a critical look at "safe space" as a buzzword and its implications on interpretation. This event is presented by Maggie Schmidt and was part of the 2016 Online Conference.

    Deconstructing "Safe Space" is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about taking a critical look at "safe space" as a buzzword and its implications on interpretation. This event is presented by Maggie Schmidt and was part of the 2016 Online Conference. The concept of “safe space” is often summoned as historical institutions approach challenging topics on race, politics, and identity. But what does “safety” actually look or feel like? Should institutions create experiences in which visitors feel unsafe? We’ll take a critical look at this buzzword and its implications on interpretation.

    Chair: Maggie Schmidt, Senior Exhibit Developer, 106 Group, St. Paul, MN

    This webinar was recorded as part of the 2016 Online Conference for the Annual Meeting in Detroit, MI.

  • Recorded Webinar: 2016 OLC - Intentional Inclusion: Developing a D&I Strategy for Your Organization

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Intentional Inclusion: Developing a D&I Strategy for Your Organization is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about developing a strategy for diversity and inclusion at your historic site. This event is presented by Chris Taylor and was part of the 2016 Online Conference.

    Intentional Inclusion: Developing a D&I Strategy for Your Organization is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about developing a strategy for diversity and inclusion at your historic site. This event is presented by Chris Taylor and was part of the 2016 Online Conference. As demographics in the country continue to become more diverse, museums must create new systems to be more inclusive organizations. Developing a strategy for inclusion can help history organizations efficiently create new patterns of behavior that are inclusive and supportive of all types of diversity.

    Chair: Chris Taylor, Director of Inclusion and Community Engagement, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN

    This webinar was recorded as part of the 2016 Online Conference for the Annual Meeting in Detroit, MI.

  • Recorded Webinar: 2016 OLC - Strangelove: How to Stop Worrying and Start Fundraising

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Strangelove: How to Stop Worrying and Start Fundraising is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about fundraising and exploring how staff and volunteers at organizations of all sizes can advance their mission with better understanding of the fund development process. This event is presented by Jamie Simek and was part of the 2016 Online Conference.

    Strangelove: How to Stop Worrying and Start Fundraising is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about fundraising and exploring how staff and volunteers at organizations of all sizes can advance their mission with better understanding of the fund development process. This event is presented by Jamie Simek and was part of the 2016 Online Conference. Fundraising is critical to nonprofit work, but it isn’t exclusively reserved for executive directors, development staff, and board committees. This discussion will demystify fundraising and explore how staff and volunteers at organizations of all sizes can advance their mission with better understanding of the fund development process.

    Chair: Jamie Simek, Fundraising Educator - Local History Services, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, IN

    This webinar was recorded as part of the 2016 Online Conference for the Annual Meeting in Detroit, MI.

  • Recorded Webinar: 2017 OLC - Engaging Programs = Engaging Communities?

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Engaging Programs = Engaging Communities? is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about steps to help you engage more effectively with your local community. This event is presented by Max A. van Balgooy, Christian Cotz, Dawn DiPrince, and Ken Turino and is part of the 2017 Online Conference recordings.

    Engaging Programs = Engaging Communities? is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about steps to help you engage more effectively with your local community. This event is presented by Max A. van Balgooy, Christian Cotz, Dawn DiPrince, and Ken Turino and is part of the 2017 Online Conference recordings. History museums and historic sites are always part of a community, but what makes a community want to engage with it? This session will explore three different approaches as well as develop a set of practical steps to help you engage more effectively with your local community.

    Max A. van Balgooy, President, Engaging Places LLC

    Christian Cotz, Director of Education & Visitor Engagement, Montpelier

    Dawn DiPrince, Founder and Leader, Museum of Memory Project

    Ken Turino, Adjunct Professor, Tufts University

    This webinar was recorded as part of the 2017 Online Conference for the Annual Meeting in Austin, TX.