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  • Recorded Webinar: History Check-In: Women's Suffrage

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/23/2018

    History Check-In: Women's Suffrage is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the history of woman suffrage in the United States and the Nineteenth Amendment. This event is presented by Susan Ware.

    History Check-In: Women's Suffrage is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the history of woman suffrage in the United States and the Nineteenth Amendment. This event is presented by Susan Ware. This AASLH webinar presents a general introduction to the history of woman suffrage in the United States, organizing in the theme of "the long Nineteenth Amendment," to puts women's struggle for the vote in conversation with other movements for democracy and equality across the sweep of American history. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). The webinar is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    Details:

    RECORD DATE: Tuesday, October 23, 2018

    COST: $20 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $30 Non-members

    Description & Outcomes

    In this webinar, Susan Ware presents a general introduction to the history of woman suffrage in the United States, timed to coincide with the many commemorative events planned around the centennial of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment on August 26, 2020. Its organizing theme is "the long Nineteenth Amendment."  Just as historians talk about a long nineteenth century stretching from the American Revolution through the early twentieth century, or a long civil rights movement that predates the activism of the 1950s and 1960s, a focus on the long Nineteenth Amendment allows us to start the story before the iconic Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and extend it beyond the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920.  Among other outcomes, this broader approach to suffrage history puts women's struggle for the vote in conversation with other movements for democracy and equality across the sweep of American history.

    Participant Outcomes:

    • familiarity with the main themes and major players of the national suffrage movement
    • awareness of regional differences:  how the story played out on state and local levels, with special attention to the South and West
    • an understanding of the central role of race in the woman suffrage movement, both the active roles played by African American suffragists and the evidence of racism on the part of white women in the movement
    • a framework for linking the suffrage movement to contemporary events by not seeing 1920 as a hard stop or the end of the story, but as part of a continuum of ongoing and contested questions about gender, citizenship, and the vote.

    Speaker:

    A blond woman with bangs and round glasses smiles at the camera. She wears a sweater and scarf, is visible from slightly below the shoulders, and stands in front of a brick windowed building.A pioneer in the field of women’s history and a leading feminist biographer, Susan Ware is the author and editor of numerous books on twentieth-century U.S. history. Educated at Wellesley College and Harvard University, she has taught at New York University and Harvard, where she served as editor of the biographical dictionary Notable American Women: Completing the Twentieth Century (2004). Since 2012, she has served as the general editor of the American National Biography, published by Oxford University Press under the auspices of the American Council of Learned Societies. Ware has long been associated with the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and is currently writing a book of suffrage stories inspired by its collections.

  • Recorded Webinar: History Crash Course: The American Experience in WWI

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History Crash Course: The American Experience in WWI is an AASLH continuing education recorded webinar. This webinar is presented by Jennifer D. Keene and is part of the History Crash Course webinar series, presented in partnership with the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

    This lecture webinar offers a brief overview of current scholarship on the American experience in World War I, the key challenges facing smaller historical organizations seeking to mount exhibits on the war, some strategies for placing objects in their proper historical context, and ways to underscore the relevance of WWI for American society today. 

     RECORDED DATE: March 28, 2017

    About the Lecturer:

    Jennifer D. Keene is a professor of history and chair of the History Department at Chapman University. She is a specialist in American military experience during World War I.  She has published three books on the American involvement in the First World War: Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America (2001), World War I: The American Soldier Experience (2011), and The United States and the First World War (2000).  She is the lead author for an American history textbook, Visions of America: A History of the United States that uses a visual approach to teaching students U.S. history. She is also a general editor for the “1914-1918-online,” peer-reviewed online encyclopedia, http://www.1914-1918-online.net/, a major digital humanities project.  

     The History Crash Course Webinar Series is conducted in partnership with the Organization of American Historians. We invite you to find out more about OAH by visiting their website here.


  • Recorded Webinar: History Relevance Coffee Break with Ford's Theatre

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/13/2018

    History Relevance Coffee Break with Ford's Theatre is an AASLH Continuing Education online event originally presented live on December 13, 2018. This webinar is about how the Ford's Theatre is making history relevant by connecting the past to the present. This webinar is presented by David McKenzie and Conny Graft and is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series, presented in partnership with the History Relevance initiative.

    Take a coffee break with David McKenzie of Ford's Theatre and Conny Graft of the History Relevance initiative. During this thirty-minute interview, David and Conny discuss the challenges faced and lessons learned during Ford's Theatre's prototyping project

    This webinar is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series. Each webinar in this short-form series showcases projects by history organizations that are making history relevant to their communities in meaningful, measurable, and replicable ways. Webinar participants will glean practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the present and meet their relevance goals.

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: Thursday, December 13, 2018

    COST: $Free Members / $5 Non-members

    Description and Outcomes:

    Interview Questions:

    • Tell us about how you connected issues of the past with issues of the present?
    • What were some of the challenges you faced in implementing this project?
    • What did you learn from the evaluation of your project?
    • Based on your experience making history relevant through this project, what are the three most important suggestions you have for others working to make history relevant at their institutions?

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Learn how Ford's Theatre makes history relevant in measurable and replicable ways
    • Feel inspired by the featured organization to endorse the Value of History Statement and employ formal survey and evaluation techniques when evaluating the success of their projects
    • Feel motivated to think creatively about how they can make history relevant through projects at their own institution
    • Learn practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the presents

    Speakers:

    • Conny Graft, Steering Committee Member, History Relevance Initiative
    • David McKenzie, Associate Director for Interpretive Resources, Ford's Theatre

  • Recorded Webinar: History Relevance Coffee Break with Washington State Historical Society

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/29/2018

    History Relevance Coffee Break with Washington State Historical Society is an AASLH Continuing Education online event on November 29, 2018. This live webinar is about how the Washington State Historical Society is making history relevant by connecting the past to the present. This webinar is presented by Gwen Whiting and Elisabeth Marsh and is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series, presented in partnership with the History Relevance initiative.

    Take a coffee break with Gwen Whiting of Washington State Historical Society and Elisabeth Marsh of the Organization of American Historians and the History Relevance initiative. During this thirty-minute interview, Gwen and Elisabeth discuss the challenges faced and lessons learned in the development of Washington State Historical Society's new permanent exhibit, "Washington, My Home."

    This webinar is part of the History Relevance Coffee Break webinar series. Each webinar in this short-form series showcases projects by history organizations that are making history relevant to their communities in meaningful, measurable, and replicable ways. Webinar participants will glean practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the present and meet their relevance goals.

    Details:

    RECORDING DATE: Thursday, November 29, 2018

    COST: $Free Members / $5 Non-members

    Description and Outcomes:

    Interview Questions:

    • Tell us about how you connected issues of the past with issues of the present?
    • What were some of the challenges you faced in implementing this project?
    • What did you learn from the evaluation of your project?
    • Based on your experience making history relevant through this project, what are the three most important suggestions you have for others working to make history relevant at their institutions?

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Learn how Washington State Historical Society makes history relevant in measurable and replicable ways
    • Feel inspired by the featured organization to endorse the Value of History Statement and employ formal survey and evaluation techniques when evaluating the success of their projects
    • Feel motivated to think creatively about how they can make history relevant through projects at their own institution
    • Learn practical tips for how organizations can connect issues of the past to issues of the presents

    Speakers:

    • Elisabeth Marsh, Director of Membership and Program Development, Organization of American Historians; Steering Committee Member, History Relevance Initiative
    • Gwen Whiting, Lead Curator, Washington State Historical Society
  • Recorded Webinar: How to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fundraising

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    How to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fundraising is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the benefits of proactive, strategic fundraising. This event is presented by Jamie Simek and David Janssen.

    How to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fundraising is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the benefits of proactive, strategic fundraising. This event is presented by Jamie Simek and David Janssen. Although fundraising is critical and necessary to nonprofit work, staff and volunteers often have a less than favorable opinion of the process. In museums and historical organizations of all sizes, fundraising myths, biases and misunderstandings can make us uncomfortable and ineffective. However, fundraising is not exclusively reserved for development staff and board committees. We can all benefit our institutions by better understanding the process, how it functions in our organizations and how we can help improve the outcomes. This webinar will discuss the benefits of proactive, strategic fundraising. Whether at an all-volunteer organization, a small shop with limited staff or a larger institution with dedicated development officers, there are always tactics to produce better results. By applying basic fundraising principles and best practices, and learning from the experiences of colleagues, we can build better relationships with current and future supporters. We can stop worrying and embrace fund development.

    About the Instructors:

    Jamie Simek

    Jamie Simek helps organizations get organized. As an educator, she has helped small groups--from student organizations to alumni chapters to local history organizations-- build capacity and improve their programming from the inside out. Jamie’s 15 year career in organization and constituent relations includes stops in university and alumni relations, student organization advising, veterans services and development research . In her current position with Local History Services at the Indiana Historical Society (IHS), she is responsible for developing and implementing the fundraising education program for the IHS Heritage Support Grants program. She holds a Master of Science in Education from Purdue University, where she also earned her bachelor's degree.

    David Janssen

    David Janssen has over 25 years’ experience in museum and historic site leadership at both large and small institutions. He has served as the executive director of Brucemore, a property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, since 2012. He also served as Vice President of Collections and Interpretation at the Detroit Historical Society; Vice President of Internal Operations at Edsel & Eleanor Ford House; and as Curator of the Smith-McDowell House Museum. He earned a BA in history from Dartmouth College, an MA in history from Duquesne University, and an MBA from the University of Iowa – and is also a 2008 graduate of the Seminar for Historical Administration.

  • Recorded Webinar: Humanities for All

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/17/2018

    How can partnership with higher education institutions increase the reach, capacity, and impact of our history work? This AASLH webinar examines a successful collaboration between an academic institution and a historical society, and introduces Humanities for All, a new resource from National Humanities Alliance that showcases such partnerships between higher education and community organizations. This webinar was recorded on October 17, 2018.

    How can partnership with higher education institutions increase the reach, capacity, and impact of our history work? This AASLH webinar examines a successful collaboration between an academic institution and a historical society, and introduces Humanities for All, a new resource from National Humanities Alliance that showcases such partnerships between higher education and community organizations.

    Details:

    Recorded DATE: Wednesday, October 17, 2018

    COST: Free to Members / $20 Non-members

    Description & Outcomes

    Humanities for All is a new website from the National Humanities Alliance (NHA) that showcases over 1,400 examples of higher education–community partnerships involving teaching, research, and public programming. In this AASLH webinar, Daniel Fisher (NHA) introduces Humanities for All, presents strategies for utilizing the website, and leads a discussion with the project directors of “These Words: A Century of Printing, Writing, and Reading in Boston's Chinese Community,” Jessica Wong Camhi (Chinese Historical Society of New England) and Diane O'Donoghue (Tufts University and Brown University). The facilitated discussion presents takeaways from the “These Words” partnership. Participants will feel confident and inspired to apply the lessons of “These Words” and other projects from Humanities for All to their own successful and mutually beneficial partnerships with higher education institutions. A Q&A period follows the presentation.

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Participants will understand how they can use Humanities for All as a resource.
    • Participants will feel inspired to explore Humanities for All.
    • Participants will learn the challenges and successes of the “These Words” partnership.
    • Participants will feel confident and inspired to apply the lessons of “These Words” and other projects from Humanities for All to their own partnerships with higher education institutions.
    • Participants will feel inspired to explore partnership with a local higher education institution.

    Speakers:

    A young man in a sports jacket, tie, and black-rimmed glasses smiles at the camera. A tree is in the background. Daniel Fisher is a project director and postdoctoral fellow at the National Humanities Alliance Foundation. At NHA, Daniel leads Humanities for All, a survey of publicly engaged humanities work in U.S. higher education funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The Humanities for All website launched in July at http://www.humanitiesforall.org. The website presents a cross-section of the field for practice and advocacy, including over 1,400 projects that are searchable, sortable, and illustrated with a selection of in-depth profiles. Prior to joining NHA, he held fellowships at the École Biblique and the Albright Institute in Jerusalem. He holds a B.A. from McGill University, an M.A. from Vanderbilt University, and a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, where, as a graduate student, he taught and co-curated a publicly-engaged research-driven exhibition.

     

    A middle aged woman with blonde hair, circular glasses, and a cowl neck sweater smiles at the camera.Diane O’Donoghue, a visual and cultural historian, is Director of the Program for Public Humanities and Senior Fellow for the Humanities at the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life, at Tufts University, where she has chaired the Department of Visual and Critical Studies. She is also Visiting Professor of Public Humanities at Brown University and a contributor to a collection, titled "Doing Public Humanities,” that will be published by Routledge.

     

     

    A young woman with brown hair and brown eyes, wearing tortoiseshell glasses and a a blazer, smiles at the camera.Jessica Wong Camhi is the director of the Chinese Historical Society of New England (CHSNE), a Boston-based non-profit dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting the history and legacy of Chinese immigration to the New England area.

  • Recorded Webinar: Implementing NAGPRA: The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Implementing NAGPRA: The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the basics of NAGPRA, exploring the benefits of tribal consultation, and sharing resources for museums. This event is presented by Anne Amati and Angela Neller.

    Implementing NAGPRA: The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the basics of NAGPRA, exploring the benefits of tribal consultation, and sharing resources for museums. This event is presented by Anne Amati and Angela Neller. Do you know if NAGPRA applies to any of your institution’s collections? Almost 30 years after the passage of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), there is still misunderstanding and confusion among some in the museum community regarding its requirements and procedures. In this session we will discuss the basics of NAGPRA, explore the benefits of tribal consultation, and share resources for museums. You will feel more confident engaging with NAGPRA implementation and consulting with tribal partners, even if you don’t have NAGRA cultural items in your collection. In this webinar, guest speakers Anne Amati, NAGPRA Coordinator and Registrar at the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, and Angela Neller, Curator for the Wanapum Heritage Center in Washington State, will discuss the basics of NAGPRA and explore how NAGPRA implementation can benefit you and your museum. Through several case studies, Anne and Angela will demonstrate how museums have implemented NAGPRA. They will also discuss available resources including online databases, grants, and training opportunities. Whether NAGPRA is new to you or you would benefit from a refresher discussion, this webinar will help you feel more confident about NAGPRA implementation and consulting with tribal representatives. You will also learn how museums can benefit from building relationships with Native American communities beyond NAGPRA implementation.

    Speakers

    Anne Amati is the NAGPRA Coordinator and Registrar at the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, a small teaching museum dedicated to educating students about the ethical practices of conservation, interpretation, and management of anthropological collections. Ms. Amati is also an Adjunct Instructor for the University of Denver Museum and Heritage Studies program and works closely with students on collection management and exhibit projects. 

    Angela Neller is the Curator for the Wanapum Heritage Center in Washington State. She has 29 years of experience managing archaeological, ethnographic, and archival collections. Angela provides technical expertise in repatriation matters to the Wanapum Band of Priest Rapids, a non-federally recognized Indian Group. As a Native Hawaiian, Angela is interested in the relationship of material culture and history to the identity of native peoples. She values objects as touchstones to generations past as they help to inform the present and future. 

  • Recorded Webinar: Instagram for Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Instagram for Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the use of Instagram for historic institutions. This event is presented by Hannah Hethmon.

    Instagram for Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the use of Instagram for historic institutions. This event is presented by Hannah Hethmon. Instagram is a growing image-sharing platform where younger audiences (and older ones too) share everything from casual snapshots to professional photography and art. Increasingly, Instagram connects artists, photographers, and influences around shared locations, interests, and hobbies. Museums and historic sites are well-positioned to use Instagram to increase awareness of their institution, further their mission, engage their audience online, and inspire new and existing audiences to visit. In this webinar, AASLH’s Hannah Hethmon will give an in-depth lesson on Instagramming for your institution. 

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. This event is presented by Dr. Debra A. Reid.

    Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. This event is presented by Dr. Debra A. Reid.Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017) encourages us to put an "H" (the humanities, not just history) into a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subject – a STEALTH approach. During this webinar, Dr. Reid will summarize main points from Interpreting Agriculture,  including an overview of different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. Reid will summarize a critical thinking approach that uses visual evidence (prescriptive literature and photographic evidence) to document agricultural tools and equipment. The session will continue with a conversation among participants about how they will document agriculture in their location (be it farms in the countryside or the city, or agricultural business that served farm families historically and today). The session will conclude with a discussion about what else museums and historic site staff need to interpret agriculture most effectively, and will end with a question and answer session.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about ways to tackle the various components of American military history, providing alternatives to the traditional museum experience. This event is presented by Marc Blackburn.

    Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about ways to tackle the various components of American military history, providing alternatives to the traditional museum experience. This event is presented by Marc Blackburn. Across the country, museums and historic sites welcome visitors into a world long gone but fundamental to America today. Military history in particular is etched into our country’s culture and the public’s imagination. The trouble, though, for museums and historical sites lies in continuing to make it both accessible and relevant to today’s audiences. Utilizing material from his Rowman & Littlefield book Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites, historian Marc Blackburn of Mount Rainier National Park and the America at War Podcast introduces ways to tackle the various components of American military history, providing alternatives to the traditional museum experience. Blackburn will share strategies for making stories and collections relevant to modern audiences. Armed with these strategies, history organizations will have the foundation to provide compelling, relevant, and engaging experiences for audiences.