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  • Recorded Webinar: Grappling with Confederate Monuments and Iconography

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/28/2016

    March 28, 2016 | The tragic shootings at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston in June 2015 precipitated a national outcry against the Confederate flag. State leaders in Alabama and South Carolina removed it from capitol grounds. Walmart and other retailers discontinued merchandise bearing the flag. Meanwhile, the controversy expanded to include Confederate monuments and statues. In this webinar, AASLH’s Bob Beatty moderates a discussion with author and public historian Kevin Levin, Gordon Jones of the Atlanta History Center, and Dina Bailey of the Center for Civil and Human Rights to learn how the field of state and local history can respond.

    The tragic shootings at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston in June 2015 precipitated a national outcry against the Confederate flag. State leaders in Alabama and South Carolina removed it from capitol grounds. Walmart and other retailers discontinued merchandise bearing the flag. Meanwhile, the controversy expanded to include Confederate monuments and statues. In this webinar, AASLH’s Bob Beatty moderates a discussion with author and public historian Kevin Levin, Gordon Jones of the Atlanta History Center, and Dina Bailey of the Center for Civil and Human Rights to learn how the field of state and local history can respond.

    RECORDED DATE: March 28, 2016

  • Recorded Webinar: Growing Things: Case Studies in Interpreting Agriculture

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Growing Things: Case Studies in Interpreting Agriculture is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about successes in linking site-specific and culturally distinct stories to the big topic of agriculture.

    Growing Things: Case Studies in Interpreting Agriculture is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about successes in linking site-specific and culturally distinct stories to the big topic of agriculture. Farm to fork – Community Supported Agriculture – Locally sourced foods. Any AASLH member can find ways to connect their institution to these hot topics. Presenters in this webinar share their successes in linking site-specific and culturally distinct stories to the big topic of agriculture. They show that place matters, that nature and the environment provide a foundation to interpret farming, and that institutions from historic houses and historical societies to metro parks (rural, urban, and suburban) have the resources to engage their audiences in “agriculture.” Each attendee will have access to the same questions that presenters addressed as they prepared for the webinar. Webinar attendees can use these questions to launch their own agriculture interpretation.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Developing Discussion Based Interpretation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Historic House Call: Developing Discussion Based Interpretation is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how conversation promotes individual and group learning and helps to build connections to historic sites. This event is presented by Ron M. Potvin and is part of the Historic House Call series, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee.

    Historic House Call: Developing Discussion Based Interpretation is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how conversation promotes individual and group learning and helps to build connections to historic sites. This event is presented by Ron M. Potvin and is part of the Historic House Call series, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee. Conversation. Chat. Dialogue. Discussion. These are words that visitors may not often associate with the guided tour. However, historic house museums have the unique opportunity to invite visitors in, offer them a place to sit, and give them a voice. This webinar illustrates how conversation promotes individual and group learning and helps to build connections to historic sites. It will provide strategies for encouraging conversation and discussion on tours, including asking the right questions, listening, and breaking down barriers to comfort and connection. Attendees will also receive resources and training materials for interpreters.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Home for the Holidays: Interpreting Christmas at Your Historic Site

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/24/2018

    Home for the Holidays: Interpreting Christmas at Your Historic Site is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about planning for the Christmas holiday at your historic site. This event is presented by Kenneth Turino and Andy Hahn.

    Christmas in July? Yes, it’s time to start planning for the Christmas holiday at your historic site. For many historic sites, the holiday season, Christmas and New Year’s, are the most visited times of the year. This webinar will examine the pros and cons of interpreting the holiday and different approaches (period installations or those that only evoke the season) a site may take. This webinar will briefly present the evolution of Christmas traditions in America acknowledging regional differences.  It will also offer resources for doing research and a practical guide to obtaining period appropriate decorations and managing the installation at your historic house. The presenters will offer successful examples and ideas for hosting a wide variety of events appropriate to the season and your site.

    About the Presenters:

    Kenneth Turino is Manager of Community Engagement and Exhibitions at Historic New England. Mr. Turino oversees the exhibitions program at Historic New England and community engagement projects in New England. Previously, Mr. Turino was Executive Director of the Lynn Museum, an active local history museum in Lynn, Massachusetts. Ken is an adjunct professor in the Tufts University Museum Studies Program. There he teaches courses on the future of historic houses. Mr. Turino is a Trustee of the House of Seven Gables in Salem, Massachusetts. He is on the faculty of The History Leadership Institute. Along with Max van Balgooy, he is in an instructor for AASLH’s Reinventing the Historic House Museum Workshop. He has published several articles on the history of Christmas and speaks on the topic widely.

    Andy Hahn is the executive director of the Campbell House Museum in St. Louis.  During his 15-year tenure he managed the planning and completion of a $3 million building restoration effort and more recently he spearheaded an expansion of the Museum’s research efforts culminating in the publication of two major books. Previously Andy was the curator of the corporate art collection and the corporate historian at the international brokerage firm A.G. Edwards. Andy is a member of AASLH’s Historic House Museums Committee.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: How to Preserve Your Historic Building

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Historic House Call: How to Preserve Your Historic Building is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Rehabilitation of Historic Structures, the methods for applying them to your historic building, and how they can help you apply for funds. This event is part of the Historic House Call, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee.

    Historic House Call: How to Preserve Your Historic Building is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Rehabilitation of Historic Structures, the methods for applying them to your historic building, and how they can help you apply for funds. This event is part of the Historic House Call, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee. Rehabilitating and preserving an historic building can be challenging...unless you have the right tools! Come learn about the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Rehabilitation of Historic Structures, the methods for applying them to your historic building, and how they can help you apply for funds! Historic Buildings are simultaneously the largest asset and the greatest liability for many organizations.  This session will provide an overview of the tools available for funding, and the Standards most often associated with those funding tools. This session will primarily focus on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. The presenters will provide an overview of the four different treatment types, and review in detail, the most commonly-used treatment: Rehabilitation.  Each of the ten Rehabilitation Standards will be reviewed, illustrating with examples how they are applied.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Immersive Education in Historic House Museums

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Historic House Call: Immersive Education in Historic House Museums is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the unique ways the Molly Brown House Museum and Byers-Evans House Museum, in Denver, CO, have reworked their spaces. This event is presented by Jamie Melissa Wilms and Jillian Allison.

    Historic House Call: Immersive Education in Historic House Museums is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the unique ways the Molly Brown House Museum and Byers-Evans House Museum, in Denver, CO, have reworked their spaces. This event is presented by Jamie Melissa Wilms and Jillian Allison. This webinar looks at the unique ways the Molly Brown House Museum and Byers-Evans House Museum, in Denver, CO, have reworked their spaces to bring in more immersive, hands-on sensory learning not only for school children, but also for new groups including young professionals, repeat visitors, and the like.  This webinar will inspire attendees to look at their space in a whole new way and not be afraid to look beyond the ropes.

    About the Presenters:

    Jamie Melissa Wilms is originally from Wisconsin and moved to Colorado in 2009.  She has a BA in American History/Public Administration from Northern Michigan University and a MA in Historical Administration/American History from Eastern Illinois University.  Jamie has worked in the museum field for over 15 years in museums across the country including Wisconsin, Arizona, Florida, New York, Michigan, Illinois, and of course Colorado.  She has been Director of Education at the Molly Brown House Museum since 2013.  Outside of her passion for history, Jamie loves to run, hike, spend time outdoors, watch football (Go Pack Go), and spend time with family & friends.

    Jillian Allison is the director of the Byers-Evans House Museum, a Community Museum of History Colorado.  Prior to joining History Colorado in 2014, she worked in collections and education at the Denver Museum of Miniatures, Dolls and Toys and the Nicolaysen Art Museum in Casper, Wyoming.  Jillian completed an MA in Museum Studies from San Francisco State University.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Interpreting Historic Landscapes

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Historic House Call: Interpreting Historic Landscapes is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the variety of ways in which sites across the country are approaching the interpretation of diverse historic landscapes. This event is presented by Sean Sawyer and is part of the Historic House Call series presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee.

    Historic House Call: Interpreting Historic Landscapes is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the variety of ways in which sites across the country are approaching the interpretation of diverse historic landscapes. This event is presented by Sean Sawyer and is part of the Historic House Call series presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee. Over the past decade there has been much hand-wringing about the decline and fall of the historic house museum and much attention paid to strategies for resuscitating or abandoning them. All the while, a key resource for expanding the meaning of historic sites, deepening the visitor experience, and enhancing sustainability lay right outside the door: the historic landscape. This webinar will examine the variety of ways in which sites across the country are approaching the interpretation of diverse historic landscapes, from large estates to small urban sites, in order to expand a site’s significance and stimulate engagement for contemporary audiences. Join Sean Sawyer as he presents case studies focused on extracting lessons from the front lines of historic landscape interpretation.  Issues examined will include: shifting organizational culture and public perception to understand the significance and value of historic landscapes; the development of site-wide interpretation to include historic landscapes as integral, rather than supplementary; the inclusion of viewsheds within the interpretation of historic landscapes; the logistics of landscape tours, including pricing, guide training, interpretive technologies, accessibility, and weather concerns; and tactics for community engagement through the historic landscape.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Planning for Special Events

    Contains 9 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/30/2018

    This AASLH webinar, presented by Gennie Truelock and Tara Richards, provides examples and inspiration for planning special events at historic house museums. The webinar is presented by the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group as part of the Historic House Call webinar series, designed to connect staff and volunteers of historic house museums with leading experts in the field.

    Details:

    RECORDING DATE: Tuesday, October 30

    Description & Outcomes

    Is your historic house museum rethinking its ability to generate community interest and relevance? Are you looking for new and exciting ways to engage your current visitors while attracting new ones? Expand your reach by putting on a special event! Whether you are a large historic site or a small house museum there are a multitude of ways to attract audiences while still meeting your mission goals. By providing your public with dynamic alternatives to a tour, your institution can break the mold of the traditional historic house museum and inspire curiosity and interest that also encourages repeat visitation. In this AASLH webinar, presenters Gennie Truelock (Workman & Temple Family Homestead Museum) and Tara Richards (Brucemore)  provide examples of special events that range from the small (20-100 people) to the large (1000+ people) that appeal to a variety of audiences and provide participants with practical tools and tips for planning and implementing a wide range of events.

    Participant Outcomes:

    • Participants will understand that special events can be of any size and level of complexity and that good planning is key to having a smooth event.
    • Participants will be inspired to generate new event ideas while avoiding mission drift.
    • Participants will receive examples of event contracts for professional services and vendors, and tools that can be adapted for event planning at their site.

    Speakers:

    Gennie Truelock is the Programs Manager at the Workman & Temple Family Homestead Museum in California. She is an advocate of using storytelling methods as a tool to encourage audiences to see the relevance of the history that surrounds them, and has helped to implement a variety of programming experiences for visitors ranging from immersive tour experiences to theatrical presentations. She is a member of AASLH’s Historic House Museums Committee.

    Tara Richards is Director of Community Engagement at Brucemore.

  • Recorded Webinar: Historic House Call: Risk Assessment in Historic Houses

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Historic House Call: Risk Assessment in Historic Houses is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about unique issues in historic house preservation needs, especially in terms of disaster preparedness. This event is presented by Samantha Forsko and is part of the Historic House Call webinar series, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee.

    Historic House Call: Risk Assessment in Historic Houses is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about  unique issues in historic house preservation needs, especially in terms of disaster preparedness. This event is presented by Samantha Forsko and is part of the Historic House Call webinar series, presented in partnership with the AASLH Historic House Affinity Group Committee. Historic houses present unique issues in their preservation needs, especially in terms of disaster preparedness. This webinar explores those needs through a discussion of hazards, risk assessments and evaluations, and mitigation methods – all with a focus on historic houses.


    Samantha Forsko is the Preservation Specialist at the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts (CCAHA), where she primarily works with institutions and their collections. She conducts on-site preservation needs and risk assessments and assists with preservation and emergency planning. She also develops and presents educational programs and provides technical information to libraries, archives, museums, historic sites, and other cultural institutions.  Since starting at the Center in 2015, Samantha has also been the project manager of the Pennsylvania Cultural Resilience Network (PaCRN), aiming to improve emergency response and preparedness for cultural institutions across the state. Before joining CCAHA, Samantha worked at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as a collections manager. In addition to providing long-term care for the nearly 200,000 permanent collection objects owned by LACMA, she also served on the Emergency Preparedness Committee, responsible for writing, updating, and training the 300 member staff on the implementation of the institution’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan. She has previously worked as a conservation technician for the Regional Arts and Culture Council and Cascadia Art Conservation Center, both in Portland, Oregon, primarily providing preventive maintenance and care for outdoor public art collections. Samantha received her MA in Arts Management with a focus on Archival and Museum Studies from Claremont Graduate University, in Claremont, California, writing her master’s thesis on Emergency Preparedness in Cultural Institutions.

  • Recorded Webinar: History Check-In: Immigration and Citizenship During the WWI Era

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/05/2018

    History Check-In: Immigration and Citizenship During the WWI Era is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about immigration and citizenship in the United States during the World War I era. This webinar is presented by Michael Innis-Jimenez. The History Check-In webinar series is presented in partnership with the Organization of American Historians (OAH).

    In this History Check-in webinar, Michael Innis-Jiménez provides an overview of immigration and citizenship during the World War I era with an emphasis on Mexican immigration. Just as immigration and racialized immigrants are at the forefront of today’s national political discourse, Innis-Jiménez will explain why the debate about immigrants and immigration was influential in shaping discourse during the earlier era. This webinar will also outline the push and pull influences in the changing immigration patterns and discuss how Mexican immigration to the U.S. influenced the broader, post-World War I immigrant demographics. This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: Monday, November 5, 2018

    COST: $10 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $20 Non-members

    Description & Outcomes:

    Participant Outcomes:

    After this webinar, participants will:

    • Be able to explain and evaluate the major themes and developments of immigration to the United States in the World War I era.
    • Be familiar with political and social influences on immigration patterns to the United States in the World War I era.
    • Be able to trace the influence of historical Mexican immigrant stereotypes on immigration.

    Speaker:

    Headshot_Innis-Jimenez-Mike-130x150Michael Innis-Jiménez has a PhD in history from the University of Iowa. He is associate professor and director of graduate studies in the department of American Studies at the University of Alabama.  I have also served as a consultant and team member with the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute’s Latino New South Project and consultant with the Levine Museum of the New South (Charlotte, NC), the lead museum of the Latino New South Project’s three-museum consortium.  Innis-Jiménez’ books include Steel Barrio: The Great Mexican Migration to South Chicago, 1915-1940 (NYU Press, 2013) and Made in Chicago: Mexican Food, Tourism, and Cultural Identity (under contract with the University of Texas Press, in progress). Both books focus on the World War I through interwar periods.