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  • Recorded Webinar: Instagram for Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Instagram for Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the use of Instagram for historic institutions. This event is presented by Hannah Hethmon.

    Instagram for Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the use of Instagram for historic institutions. This event is presented by Hannah Hethmon. Instagram is a growing image-sharing platform where younger audiences (and older ones too) share everything from casual snapshots to professional photography and art. Increasingly, Instagram connects artists, photographers, and influences around shared locations, interests, and hobbies. Museums and historic sites are well-positioned to use Instagram to increase awareness of their institution, further their mission, engage their audience online, and inspire new and existing audiences to visit. In this webinar, AASLH’s Hannah Hethmon will give an in-depth lesson on Instagramming for your institution. 

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. This event is presented by Dr. Debra A. Reid.

    Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. This event is presented by Dr. Debra A. Reid.Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017) encourages us to put an "H" (the humanities, not just history) into a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subject – a STEALTH approach. During this webinar, Dr. Reid will summarize main points from Interpreting Agriculture,  including an overview of different disciplinary methodology useful to interpreting agriculture (sciences, social sciences, and humanities), and then case studies of interpreting agricultural machinery using a social history and humanist approach. Reid will summarize a critical thinking approach that uses visual evidence (prescriptive literature and photographic evidence) to document agricultural tools and equipment. The session will continue with a conversation among participants about how they will document agriculture in their location (be it farms in the countryside or the city, or agricultural business that served farm families historically and today). The session will conclude with a discussion about what else museums and historic site staff need to interpret agriculture most effectively, and will end with a question and answer session.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about ways to tackle the various components of American military history, providing alternatives to the traditional museum experience. This event is presented by Marc Blackburn.

    Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about ways to tackle the various components of American military history, providing alternatives to the traditional museum experience. This event is presented by Marc Blackburn. Across the country, museums and historic sites welcome visitors into a world long gone but fundamental to America today. Military history in particular is etched into our country’s culture and the public’s imagination. The trouble, though, for museums and historical sites lies in continuing to make it both accessible and relevant to today’s audiences. Utilizing material from his Rowman & Littlefield book Interpreting American Military History at Museums and Historic Sites, historian Marc Blackburn of Mount Rainier National Park and the America at War Podcast introduces ways to tackle the various components of American military history, providing alternatives to the traditional museum experience. Blackburn will share strategies for making stories and collections relevant to modern audiences. Armed with these strategies, history organizations will have the foundation to provide compelling, relevant, and engaging experiences for audiences. 


  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about jump starting your anniversary planning. This event is presented by Kim Kenney.

    This Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide a wealth of ideas to jump start your anniversary planning.  Everyone has an anniversary coming up – why reinvent the wheel?  Learn from what others have already accomplished in their own communities. This webinar will discuss why people are drawn to celebrating and commemorating anniversaries in their own lives and in their communities, as well as the institutional benefits of planning this type of programming.  Then we will explore case studies of specific institutions that have planned and executed an anniversary celebration or commemoration, including Signature Events; Programs and Tours; Fundraising Campaigns; Exhibitions, Books and Documentaries; Audience Outreach and Community Involvement; Preservation; Partnerships; and Commemorative Products and Souvenirs.  Every idea can be scaled up or down, depending on your resources.

    About the Instructor:

    Kim Kenney graduated summa cum laude from Wells College in Aurora, NY with a major in American history and minor in creative writing, where she became a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She earned her Master of Arts degree in History Museum Studies at the Cooperstown Graduate Program. Kim became Curator of the McKinley Presidential Library & Museum in October 2001.  She is the author of six books: Canton: A Journey Through Time, Canton’s West Lawn Cemetery, Canton’s Pioneers in Flight, Canton Entertainment, Interpreting Anniversaries and Milestones at Museums and Historic Sites, and Through the Lens: The Photography of Frank Dick. Her work has appeared in The Public Historian, the journal of the National Council for Public History; White House History, the journal of the White House Historical Association; The Repository; The Boston Globe; Aviation History; and the literary magazine Mused.  She serves as editor of the Museums website at BellaOnline.com, where she has authored several ebooks, and is a member of the MuseLab Advisory Council at Kent State University.  She has appeared on The Daily Show, First Ladies: Influence & Images, and Mysteries at the Museum.  Her program “The 1918 Influenza Pandemic” was featured on C-SPAN’s series American History TV.  Kim has served as the Region 5 representative for the National Digital Newspaper Project in Ohio, a field reviewer for the Museums for America grant program through the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and a grant reviewer for The History Fund.  She is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Mount Union and teaches online museum studies courses through the Northern States Conservation Center.  She was awarded the Oakley Certificate of Merit from The Association of Gravestone Studies for her interpretive projects at West Lawn Cemetery and the Jane Weston Chapman Award from the University of Mount Union for her dedication to women’s history programming.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites Webinar

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites Webinar is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance. This event is taught by Michelle Moon and AASLH.

    Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites Webinar is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance. This event is taught by Michelle Moon and AASLH. Food is such a friendly topic that it’s often thought of as a “hook” for engaging visitors to museums and historic sites—a familiar way into other topic, or a sensory element to round out a living history interpretation. But food is more than just a hook—it’s a topic all its own, with its own history and its own uncertain future, and deserving of a central place in historic interpretation.

    With audiences more interested in food than ever before, and new research in food studies bringing interdisciplinary approaches to this complicated but compelling subject, museums and historic sites have an opportunity to draw new audiences and infuse new meaning into their food presentations. This Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide an introduction to strategies for using food and food history to develop interpretation with depth and significance, making relevant connections to contemporary issues and visitor interests. Join Michelle Moon and AASLH as we discuss how the field can better use our love of food to share our love of history.


  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about an introduction to interpreting LGBT history at museums and historic sites and first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts. This event is presented by Dr. Susan Ferentinos.

    Interpreting LGBT History at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about an introduction to interpreting LGBT history at museums and historic sites and  first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts. This event is presented by Dr. Susan Ferentinos. We will discuss first steps in planning LGBT interpretive efforts, which include: deciding if the time is right for your organization to interpret LGBT history; approaching the sources; conceptualizing your story; and trust-building. Drawing on numerous case studies, Dr. Ferentinos will offer a range of success stories and suggest what we can learn from these examples.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for engaging with Native Americans beyond the legal framework of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). This event is presented by Raney Bench.

    Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about strategies for engaging with Native Americans beyond the legal framework of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). This event is presented by Raney Bench. Many museums and historic sites pride themselves on telling inclusive stories about the histories of the people in the communities they serve. Institutions often collaborate with groups within those communities to create better exhibitions and programming. But, when there is a long history of exclusion and disenfranchisement within the museum framework, as is the case for the numerous Native nations and First Nations tribes of North America, how can cultural institutions make efforts to have better relationships with these historically under-served communities? In today’s world, how can we provide space for and elevation to the voices of those who have been historically silenced?

    The Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites webinar will provide strategies for engaging with Native Americans beyond the legal framework of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), in order to work collaboratively, share authority, and incorporate multiple ways of knowing about the past into all interpretation about Native people, objects, histories, and cultures. Raney Bench will provide insight and methods on how best to purposefully work to incorporate the history, culture, and perspectives of indigenous peoples into your institutions’ interpretative programming.

    About the Speaker

    Raney Bench is the Executive Director of the Seal Cove Automotive Museum in Seal Cove, Maine. Raney Bench has a Bachelors of Art in Native American Studies and a Master of Arts in Museum Studies. She has worked with Native communities and small museums throughout the United States for almost 20 years. Raney is the author of Interpreting Native American History and Culture at Museums and Historic Sites, published by AASLH in 2014.

  • Recorded Webinar: Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This event is presented by Kristin Gallas.

    Interpreting Slavery: Building a Theoretical Foundation is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This event is presented by Kristin Gallas. Do you interpret the institution of slavery or the lives of enslaved people at your historic site/museum? Join us as we share the theoretical underpinnings for interpreting slavery, including how contested narratives and race play a role in the giving/receiving of interpretation. This webinar will help you achieve a greater understanding of the difficult knowledge and complicated emotions surrounding this complex history.

    Kristin Gallas is a consultant with the Tracing Center on Histories and Legacies of Slavery, overseeing the design of workshops for educators and public history professionals. She is the co-editor of Interpreting Slavery at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, January 2015), among other publications on best practices in the interpretation of slavery. She has led the education/interpretation departments at the Montana Historical Society, the USS Constitution Museum, and currently at the Tsongas Industrial History Center.

  • Recorded Webinar: Introduction to Podcasting for Museums and Historic Sites

    Contains 6 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/14/2018

    What is a podcast, who listens to podcasts, and why should history organizations care? Introduction to Podcasting for Museums and Historic Sites is an AASLH Continuing Education recorded webinar. This webinar is about how to create a podcast and plan for podcasting for history museums, historic sites, and history organization. This webinar is presented by Hannah Hethmon.

    What is a podcast, who listens to podcasts, and why should history organizations care? In this AASLH Continuing Education webinar, Hannah Hethmon, AASLH alumna and host of the podcast #MuseumsInStrangePlaces, introduces podcasting for history museums, historic sites, and history organization. Participants in this webinar will learn how podcasting is being used by museums, what it takes to produce their own podcast, how they can decide if podcasting is right for them, and how to get started making a quality podcast on a small budget. This webinar is a great introduction or refresher for history organizations considering creating a podcast or interested in freshening up their existing podcast practice. Participants will also receive a Resource List with information on equipment, storytelling, editing, promotion, training opportunities, and more, as well as a Podcast Planning Worksheet for those inspired to start their own podcasts.

    Details:

    Recording Date: August 14, 2018

    Outcomes:

    • Participants will have a good understanding of the medium of podcasting and how it is being used (and can be used) by museums
    • Participants will be able to make an educated decision about whether or not they should have a podcast at their museum, whether they should produce in-house or out-source, and other options for using the medium to further their mission without creating their own podcast.
    • Participants who do want to start their own podcast will have a checklist for getting started and be able to create a plan and budget for their own podcast.
    • Participants who want to start a podcast will be equipped to make a strong case to stakeholders and know where to find more advanced information.

    Speaker:

    Hannah Hethmon is the producer of Museums in Strange Places, an AAM award-winning podcast that explores the world through it’s museums. She just finished a nine-month Fulbright fellowship in Iceland studying language and museums. Prior to that, she worked as AASLH’s Membership Marketing Coordinator. Currently living in Warsaw, Poland, Hannah is a native of the greater D.C. area and holds an M.A. in Medieval Icelandic Studies. She is passionate about helping museums communicate effectively and meaningfully with their audiences. Find her on Twitter @hannah_rfh.

  • Recorded Webinar: Is Your Museum Grant Ready?

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/04/2018

    Is Your Museum Grant Ready? is an AASLH Continuing Education webinar recorded on June 4, 2018. This webinar is about self-assessing your institution’s grant-readiness. It is presented by Sarah Sutton of Sustainable Museums.

    Sarah Sutton offers a guide to self-assessing your institution’s grant-readiness and steps for bringing yourselves up to par. This 75-minute webinar reviews the institutional structures, policies, information, and practices that make museums competitive in the grants game. This webinar is adapted from Sarah’s book of the same title. Sarah Sutton narrates a step-by-step process for collecting and sharing this information, and provide examples of good practice. 

    Note: Technical issues were experienced during the original live recording of this webinar. This product is an audio-only re-recording of the presentation provided by the speaker. Slides from the original presentation are available in this product to accompany the audio recording. 

    Details:

    RECORDED DATE: June 4, 2018

    COST: $15 Members / $30 Nonmembers

    Participant Outcomes:

    • How to interact with the funder in a highly-professional and cooperative manner
    • What types of information describe audiences adequately, and demonstrate program needs and effectiveness
    • What experience and examples can highlight your institution’s value and impact
    • How to illustrate your institution’s quality as a program provider and as a reliable grant partner

    Recommended audience: 
    Those new to proposal-writing, and applicants who have been unsuccessful attracting grants for a new program or organization, or for the first few times pursuing grants.

    Speaker:

    Sarah Sutton

    Sarah Sutton leads Sustainable Museums, a consultancy helping staff and leadership of cultural and natural resource organizations plan for a more sustainable future. She and her team work with museums, historic sites, zoos, gardens, and aquariums to identify and pursue greener approaches in programs, operations, and building and site management. All of her work includes helping the institution make a difference in its community. Sarah has worked in the museum field for over thirty years, and sustainability work for the last decade. She is a LEED-Accredited Professional and a Green Globes Professional and she writes about environmental sustainability in print and online. Her publications include Environmental Sustainability at Historic Sites and Museums and The Green Nonprofit: The First 52 Weeks of Your Green Journey. She is co-author of both editions of The Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Sustainability (published under the name Sarah S. Brophy.)