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  • History News Summer 2016

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. Table of Contents:On Doing Local History: Two Grandfathers by Carol Kammen; History Bytes: The End Tim Grove; If It Was Easy, Anyone Could Do It: Training Professionals for History Institutions by Rick Beard; Grappling with Unfolding Events by Jason Crabill, Melanie A. Adams, and Kyle McKoy; Why Old Places Matter by Thompson Mayes; Keeping History Above Water by Sarah W. Sutton; Speaking History to Power: History Policy Briefings in the Classroom by Jessica Choppin Roney; Award Winner Spotlight: Sharing Nashville's Civil Rights Past with the Police by Laura Caldwell Anderson. Summer 2016.

  • History News Summer 2017

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: History Organizations as a Third Place by Carol Kammen; The Whole is Greater:Have You Eaten Today? by Ashley Bouknight; Understanding and Interpreting the American Experience in World War I by Jennifer D. Keene; Steve Lubar Ruins Everything: Why Historical Societies Need Experts, Even When It Hurts by Marjory O'Toole; If You Are Slowly Improving Citizens, You Get a Better City by Heidi Legg and Marieke Van Damme; Museums in Motion Today by Juilee Decker; Leaning In to Teachable Moments by Dina A. Bailey. Summer 2017.

  • History News Summer 2018

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. 

    Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: The Stuff of History by Carol Kammen; The Whole is Greater: Getting in the Door Is the Battle by Alima Bucciantini; New Directions for La Casa Cordova: Recentering the Latinx Past and Present in Tucson by Lydia R. Otero; Failing Forward: NUEVOlution! Latinos and the New South by Kate Baillon, Janeen Bryant, and Kamille Bostick; Giving Upsale Its Best Shot: Returning a House Museum to a Private Residence by David Young, Thompson Mayes, and Carrie Villar; Public History in Hong Kong: A Survey by Benjamin Hruska; Awards Spotlight: Scripture Rocks Heritage Park by Melinda Meyer; Technical Leaflet #283: Fundraising Basics for Local History Organizations by Jamie Simek; Reviews: Fostering Family History Services: A Guide for Librarians, Archivists, and Volunteers (rev. Lila Teresa Church); Managing Previously Unmanaged Collections: A Practical Guide for Museums (rev. Christina Bulow). Summer 2018.

  • History News Winter 2015

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: One Saturday: Two Takes by Carol Kammen; History Bytes: Looking Forward by Tim Grove; It Goes On by Garrison Keillor; Reflections on the Journey by Marilyn Carlson Nelson; Sharing Human Experience: The Story of Hole in the Day by Anton Treuer; It’s About the Story! A Revolution in Interpreting the Past by Rick Beard; Technical Leaflet #269: Improving Financial Management by Stacy L. Klingler and Laura B. Roberts. Winter 2015.

  • History News Winter 2016

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: The Local Historian as Public Intellectual by Carol Kammen; The Value of History: When History and Memory Collide by W. Todd Groce; Slaves and Slaveholders of Wessyngton by Rob DeHart; For the Love of History: The Benefits of Collections-Based Research by Katheryn P. Viens; We Are All in This Together: Twenty-First-Century Museum Leadership by Karen Whitehair; International Students Encounter Local History by Sarah E. Elia; Award Winner Spotlight: Lombard Historical Society by Jason Crabill; Technical Leaflet #273: Demonstrating Relevance by Mark Sundlov. Winter 2016.

  • History News Winter 2017

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: Encounters with History by Carol Kammen; The Whole is Greater: My Turn to Tell the Story: Internships for People of Color by Monica S. Moncada; Value of History: History is Hot Right Now: Can That Help Save the Profession? by Jason Steinhauer; The Museum as Center for Social Innovation by Jasper Visser; The Many Voices of a Historic House by Jane Mitchell Eliasof; Embezzlement: Is It Our Dirty Little Secret? by Max A. van Balgooy; Like a Phoenix: Opportunities in the Aftermath of Disaster by Samantha M. Engel; Award Winner Spotlight: Windsor Historical Society: A Please Touch Historic House Tour by Christine Ermenc, Christina Vida, and Scott Wands. Winter 2017.

  • History News Winter 2019

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. This is History News Winter 2019 Volume 74, #1.

    History News is the official magazine of AASLH. Each quarterly issue includes featured articles, regular columns, and a Technical Leaflet. 

    Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: A Multitude, Not a Monolith by Carol Kammen; The Whole is Greater: Let Your Partners Lead the Way by Leslie Lorance; Truth, Consequences, and History by Dan Snow; Engaging Descendant Communities in the Interpretation of Slavery at Museums and Historic Sites by the National Summit on Teaching Slavery; Citizen Historians, U.S. Newspapers, and the History of the Holocaust by David Klevan and Eric Schmalz; Disney, History, and Uses of the Past in Walt Disney’s Worlds by Jason S. Lantzer, Ph.D.; Award Winner Spotlight Recovering Alaska’s People and Places by Brandi Burns; Book Reviews: Teaching with Primary Sources (rev. Marietta Carr); Museums Involving Communities: Authentic Connections (rev. Inez S. Wolins); Doing History with Joseph McGill,The Slave Dwelling Project; Technical Leaflet #285: Engaging Descendant Communities in the Interpretation of Slavery: A Rubric of Best Practices by the National Summit on Teaching Slavery; History News Winter 2019 Volume 74, #1

  • Live Webinar: Creating Connextion: Building Partnerships with Your Board Members

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 09/12/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    SEPT. 12, 2019 | 3 - 4:30 PM EST | Creating Connextion: Building Partnerships with Your Board Members is an AASLH continuing education event presented by speaker Susannah Shumate on September 12, 2019. This webinar will re-frame the board/staff conversation about how we view and manage these vital partnerships.

    Let’s be honest: working with boards can be challenging, but we know we need strong boards for our organizations to be successful. So how do we make these critical relationships work? In this session, we’ll re-frame the board/staff conversation about how we view and manage these vital partnerships. During the webinar, participants will explore the motivations of board service, brainstorm ways to improve board relationships, and develop strategies to implement partnership tools.

    Details:

    DATE: September 12, 2019

    TIME: 3:00 - 4:30 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone)

    COST: $40 AASLH Members / $65 Nonmembers

    Closed captioning available upon advanced notice. Please contact flammia@aaslh.org for more information.

    Speaker:

    image

    Susannah Shumate, MAOM, CFRE is Founder and Principal of Connextion Creators LLC, a consulting agency. She has more than 20 years of experience in socioeconomic sensitivity training, fundraising, marketing and communications, and board relations. She has engineered and implemented small, local campaigns and led large, award-winning initiatives. Susannah has also served as the chief executive of small agencies and on the senior leadership teams of multimillion dollar organizations.

    Having worked with partners in the for-profit, not-for-profit, governmental, and faith-based sectors, Susannah is a recognized connector and relationship builder. She is also a sought-after speaker, writer, and panelist on topics such as socioeconomic sensitivity, strategic marketing, board relations, corporate partnerships, annual giving, major gifts, and relationship building.

    Susannah has worked in development/philanthropy, education, and operations at museums across Tennessee.

    Susannah holds a Master of Arts Degree in Organizational Management from Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville and a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Rhodes College in Memphis, where she was a history major. She also completed 36 hours of graduate study in the Public History program at Middle Tennessee State University. She is a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE); she is one of only 6,000 people in the world who hold the credential.

  • Live Webinar: History Check-In: Civil Rights and Place

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 10/10/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    OCT. 10, 2019 | 3 - 4:15 PM EST | This presentation argues that the "classic," post-World War II civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s encompassed local communities outside the regional South -- contrary to standard depictions of mid-century black social movements. Further, this presentation discusses how the forms of both white racism and black resistance differed based on the regional battlegrounds of the Midwest, Northeast, West Coast, and Border South. This webinar is presented by Clarence Lang as part of the History Check-In​ webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.​

    Civil Rights and Place: The Importance of Region to Interpreting the Black Freedom Movement of the 1950s-60

    The civil rights movement of the mid-to-late twentieth century remains a focus of popular fascination, yet few audiences are aware of the wide-ranging goals, participations, and geographical settings that made this movement possible.  This presentation argues that the "classic," post-World War II civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s encompassed local communities outside the regional South -- contrary to standard depictions of mid-century black social movements.  Further, this presentation discusses how the forms of both white racism and black resistance differed based on the regional battlegrounds of the Midwest, Northeast, West Coast, and Border South.  

    This webinar is part of the History Check-In webinar series, a partnership between the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). Each webinar in this series is designed to provide history professionals from throughout the field with an update on the current state of historiography for a particular subject.

    Details:

    DATE: October 10, 2019

    TIME: 3:00 - 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone)

    COST: $20 Members of AASLH and OAH (OAH members should contact OAH for a discount code) / $30 Non-members

    Clarence Lang

    Dean of the College of the Liberal Arts, Pennsylvania State University

    Clarence Lang is Susan Welch Dean of the College of the Liberal Arts, and Professor of African American Studies, at the Pennsylvania State University. A scholar in African American urban and social movement history, he is the author of two books: Grassroots at the Gateway: Class Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis, 1936-75; and Black America in the Shadow of the Sixties: Notes on the Civil Rights Movement, Neoliberalism, and Politics. In addition, he is the co-editor of two volumes: Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement: “Another Side of the Story” (with Robbie Lieberman); and Reframing Randolph: Labor, Black Freedom, and the Legacies of A. Philip Randolph (with Andrew Kersten). An Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer, he has published articles and essays in Journal of African American History, Journal of Urban History, Journal of Social History, Journal of Civil and Human Rights, The Black Scholar, American Studies Journal, Critical Sociology, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. Dean Lang received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    Photo credit: Emilee Spokus and the Pennsylvania State University

  • Live Webinar: Introducing the Inclusive Historians Handbook

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 09/19/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    SEPT. 19, 2019 | 3 - 4:15 PM EST | This webinar introduces The Inclusive Historian’s Handbook, a new digital resource co-sponsored by AASLH and the National Council on Public History launching in August 2019. Participants will be provided with an overview of the Handbook’s contents as well as suggestions for how to incorporate it into their practice. The facilitators will also gather feedback, ideas, and suggestions from participants regarding future additions to the Handbook’s content.

    This webinar introduces The Inclusive Historian’s Handbook, a new digital resource co-sponsored by AASLH and the National Council on Public History launching in August 2019. Participants will be provided with an overview of the Handbook’s contents as well as suggestions for how to incorporate it into their practice. The facilitators will also gather feedback, ideas, and suggestions from participants regarding future additions to the Handbook’s content.

    Details:

    DATE: September 19, 2019

    TIME: 3:00 - 4:15 pm EASTERN (Remember to adjust for your time zone)

    COST: FREE

    About The Inclusive Historian's Handbook

     The main objective of the Handbook is to support inclusive and equity-focused historical work in public settings by:

    • Sharing a knowledge base that invites more people to engage in history projects.
    • Providing concrete examples of how to make history work more relevant.
    • Centering equity, inclusivity, diversity, and public service.
    • Offering accessible windows into the many ways public historians work.

    The Handbook is for individuals and groups engaged in historical work in a wide range of settings—not just paid professionals or academic scholars. It is intended to provide community groups, educators, museum professionals (paid and unpaid), students, scholars, activists, historical societies, preservationists, archivists, and others with easy-to-find information that is directly applicable to inclusive history practice. We hope that the content is accessible to all people who are doing historical work, including those who may not identify as historians.

    The process of creating the Handbook is ongoing. As a digital resource, it is a living document. One of the key advantages of creating a digital resource is that we can easily make changes and additions to the content and respond in a timely fashion to reader recommendations as well as new developments in the field. From the project’s inception, we have tried to focus squarely on the interests and needs of the Handbook’s audience, so your voice is important to us. Over the past three years, we have benefited immensely from the generous contributions of many public historians, especially members of AASLH and NCPH. If this project is to succeed and realize fully its potential, however, we need more individuals and organizations to share their insights, experiences, and perspectives with us. 


    Kimberly Springle

    Executive Director, Charles Sumner School Museum & Archives

    Kimberly E. Springle is an Historian with a focus on community history.  Her research interests include 20th Century African American History, the history of public education, and capturing the untold stories of lesser known contributors to society.

    Kimberly presently serves as the Executive Director of the Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives, the official museum and repository for DC Public Education. In her capacity, she is the steward of the Historic Museum site and serves as the Historian and Archivist for the DC Public School System. Kimberly is also the Founder and Principal Consultant of K.E. Springle Consulting, serving communities and individuals nationwide in preserving their cultural assets and lecturing on topics related to cultural heritage. 

    Will Walker

    Associate Professor of History, Cooperstown Graduate Program in Museum Study

    Will Walker is associate professor of history at the Cooperstown Graduate Program in Museum Studies, SUNY Oneonta. He is editor of The Inclusive Historian’s Handbook and a lead editor of History@Work, the blog of the National Council on Public History. He is also the author of A Living Exhibition: The Smithsonian and the Transformation of the Universal Museum.